General Events

  • Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Samuel Labi, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Labi will be speaking on the topic of "A Methodology for Assessing the Impacts of Overweight Truck Operations on Traffic Safety and Mobility".

    The effect of overweight (OW) truck operations in terms of traffic safety and mobility is a double-edged sword: on one hand, OW operations degrade safety and mobility because each OW truck is far less agile compared to a normal-weight truck and thus counts as more than one normal-weight truck. On the other hand, OW operations improve safety and mobility because it generally leads to fewer trucks in the traffic stream, as fewer trips are needed to carry a given amount of goods. Therefore, for a given number of OW trucks in the traffic stream, the net effect falls between these two extremes. This presentation introduces two terms that respectively capture the virtuous and the villainous effects of OW operations: the Trip Reduction Effect (TRE) and Traffic Impairment Effect (TIE). Nomographs are presented for use by agencies to estimate the net safety or mobility effect of OW trucks.

    Dr. Labi is a professor of transportation and infrastructure systems engineering at Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. degree from Purdue in 2001. His areas of interest include infrastructure management and evaluation of investments and policy. Dr. Labi has authored 2 textbooks used in universities worldwide and 80 journal articles. He has served as PI for 40 research projects sponsored by the FHWA or the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Labi serves as editorial board member for American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Journal of Risk and Uncertainty in Engineering Systems and Journal of Infrastructure Systems. He is the chair of ASCE’s committee on planning, economics and finance, and secretary of the Transportation Research Board (TRB)’s committee on asset management. His research awards include ASCE’s Frank Masters Award in 2014 for outstanding and innovative work in advancing transportation systems, and TRB’s Woods prize in 2008 for outstanding journal paper in design and construction.

  • Thursday, February 2, 2017 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech Mason Bldg. 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Mikhail Chester, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in Civil, Environmental, and Sustainable Engineering at Arizona State University . Dr. Chester will be speaking on the topic of "Transportation in the Southwest: Heat and Flooding in a Climate Impacted Future".

    ABSTRACT: The Southwest represents some of the youngest and fastest growing cities in the US, with expanding public transit networks and some of the most severe forecasts for climate change. With growing populations and investments in transit, there is pressing need to plan and operate transportation systems that can maintain services during extreme events and protect passengers. To address these challenges, transportation agencies must recognize that design and operation guidelines are often associated with historical conditions, raising questions about vulnerability in a non-stationary future. A suite of projects will be presented showing the challenges and opportunities for transportation systems in a future with more frequent and intense heat and flooding. The projects will highlight how current design practices produce infrastructure vulnerabilities, climate change requires new models for planning and operating transportation systems, and transportation systems can be positioned to reduce rider’s vulnerability.

    BIO: Mikhail Chester is an Assistant Professor in Civil, Environmental, and Sustainable Engineering at Arizona State University where he runs a research laboratory focused on studying the resilience to climate change and sustainability of urban infrastructure systems. His work spans a number of infrastructure systems with an emphasis on transportation. Using stochastic models to characterize infrastructure component performance and failure, failure trees, and simulations, Chester and his students characterize the performance of infrastructure systems under extreme heat and flooding. Chester is the co-leader of the Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainability Research Network, a consortium of 10 cities across North and South America working together to develop adaptation strategies for urban infrastructure from extreme events. He maintains a body of research focused on life cycle assessment of transportation systems.  

    Chester is an Associate Editor for Transportation Research Part D, ASCE Journal of Infrastructure Systems, ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering, and the Journal of Industrial Ecology. Prior to ASU he was a post-doctoral researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley’s Institute of Transportation Studies. He received a Ph.D. (2008) from UC Berkeley in Civil and Environmental Engineering. He received a M.S. (2003) from Carnegie Mellon University. He received a dual degree B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy in 2002 from Carnegie Mellon University.

  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 5:30pm to 8:00pm
    Sixth Engine, 438 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, D.C., 20001

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Georgia Tech and NCTSPM and its member universities are pleased to announce that they will host a reception at the Transportation Research Board's 96th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

    View map with the convention center and reception sites marked.

  • Thursday, November 3, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech Mason Bldg. 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Laurie A. Garrow, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Garrow will be speaking on the topic of "Estimation of Airline Itinerary Choice Models Using Disaggregate Ticket Data".

    Airline itinerary choice models support many multi-million dollar decisions, e.g., they are used to evaluate potential route schedules. Classic models suffer from major limitations, most notably they use average fare information but to not correct for price endogeneity.   We use a novel database of airline tickets to estimate itinerary choice models using detailed fare data and compare these to classic itinerary choice models that use aggregate fare information but correct for price endogeneity.  In order to estimate these large itinerary choice models, we developed a new freeware program, called Larch.  Benchmarking experiments against Stata and Biogeme showed that the size of the input estimation files are 50 to 100 times larger in Stata and Biogeme, respectively. Estimation times are also much faster in Larch; e.g., for a small itinerary choice problem, a multinomial logit model estimated in Larch converged in less than one second whereas the same model took almost 15 seconds in Stata and more than three minutes in Biogeme. For more complex discrete choice models, such as the ordered generalized extreme value model, estimation times were two seconds in Larch and four to five days in Biogeme.

    Dr. Laurie Garrow is an Associate Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.  Dr. Garrow is a leading expert in the modeling of air traveler behavior, especially as it pertains to the prediction of travel demand. She earned her Ph.D. in Civil Engineering at Northwestern University. Her dissertation was recognized with awards from INFORMS and IATBR. She has received multiple national awards for research including the prestigious ASCE Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize, the CUTC-ARTBA New Faculty Award, and a NSF CAREER award. She currently serves as President of AGIFORS and has served as President of the Transportation Science & Logistics Society of INFORMS.  You can learn more about Dr. Garrow’s work on this project online at  https://vimeo.com/arccorp/review/179763855/84e0ac4e82

  • Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech Mason Bldg. 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Khaled Abdelghany, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Southern Methodist University. Dr. Abdelghany will be speaking on the topic of "A Real-Time Decison Support System for Robust Traffic Network Management".

    Real-time traffic network management systems are envisioned to provide network operators with decision support capabilities to alleviate recurrent and no-recurrent congestion. These capabilities involve predicting the network congestion dynamics and facilitating the development of proactive traffic management schemes that integrate traffic control and demand management strategies. However, traffic networks are subject to numerous sources of stochasticity that make it difficult to accurately predict their operational conditions and generate effective schemes to cope with these conditions. This presentation will discuss a novel decision support system for robust traffic network management which accounts for uncertainty in the network operational conditions. The objective is to develop robust traffic management schemes such that the network overall performance remains close to optimality under the different operational conditions. The modeling framework is presented, which adopts a rolling horizon framework that integrates a meta-heuristic search algorithm and a dynamic traffic assignment simulation-based methodology. The results of a set of simulation experiments that examine the system performance under different operational conditions are discussed.

     

    Dr. Khaled Abdelghany is an Associate Professor at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of Southern Methodist University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 2001. He also worked as an operations research analyst at United Airlines' R&D Division. Dr. Abdelghany joined the Department of Civil and Environmental Department at SMU in 2004 as an Assistant Professor with the responsibility of developing a transportation research program in the department. He served as the chairman of the department from 2011 to 2016. Dr. Abdelghany has extensive research experience in transportation network modeling, real-time traffic network management systems, crowd dynamics and evacuation studies, connected vehicle applications and airlines strategic planning and operations management. Dr. Abdelghany authored one book and numerous peer-reviewed journal and conference articles. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Transportation, Department of Energy, NGOs and several consulting firms. 

  • Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech Mason Bldg. 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Roger Wayson, Ph.D. and P.E., Research Engineer at KBRWyle. Dr. Wayson will be speaking on the topic of "Continuing to Understand and Improve Regulatory Models for Transportation Air Quality".

    Regulatory models for both emission and dispersion modeling are continually being updated to use in transportation air quality analysis.  It is important that the underlying assumptions and implementation of methods are understood in these models to avoid misuse and/or large errors.  Additionally, it is important that the development and updating of these models continue as we better understand the needs, uses, and desires of the analyst.  This presentation explores two topic areas from three different research efforts.  The first area covered will be specific to the EPA motor vehicle emission model (MOVES) while the second part discusses dispersion modeling of aircraft at airports.  The MOVES project that will be discussed involves modeling of ethanol blends with MOVES; in regards to both inputs and how the output emissions are changed.  The dispersion modeling will review how LiDAR measurements have been used to improve estimates from the EPA dispersion model AERMOD at airports as used in FAA regulatory models and possible future enhancements.  The presentation will conclude with a discussion of using Puff modeling applications at airports.

    Dr. Roger Wayson has been working in the fields of noise and air pollution measurements, modeling, and abatement, primarily from mobile sources, for over 44 years. He has a Bachelor and Masters degree from the University of Texas at Austin and a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.  He has authored numerous papers on transportation noise/air quality and was a lead author with the 2007 IPCC Nobel Peace Prize winning team.  He retired as a full professor from the University of Central Florida to take a job with the U.S. Department of Transportation as a National Expert in the Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.  He recently retired from his government position to take on another challenge and is working as a Research Engineer with KBRWyle. 

  • Thursday, September 8, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech Mason Bldg. 2117 (Please note location)

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Zhanmin Zhang, Clyde E. Lee Endowed Professor in Transportation Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Zhang will be speaking on the topic of "Enhancing Infrastructure Management Through Cross-asset Resource Allocation".

    Resource allocation mechanisms have become a major issue for transportation agencies in the U.S. and around the world. One of the main concerns with the transportation asset management (TAM) framework and its implementation is the absence of an organized process for cross-asset resource allocations. The objective of this study is to develop an innovative methodological framework for cross-asset resource allocations, yielding a data-oriented approach to enhancing infrastructure management. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodological framework, a case study was conducted using two asset groups, pavements and bridges, from a roadway network in Texas.   Results from the case study show that the proposed methodological framework has great potential as a tool to support highway agencies in performing cross-asset resource allocations at the network level.

    Dr. Zhanmin Zhang is Professor and holds the Clyde E. Lee Endowed Professorship in Transportation Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, where he is also Director of the Center for Resilient Infrastructure and Smart Cities. Dr. Zhang has been actively conducting research in the engineering and management of infrastructure systems and the applications of advanced information systems to infrastructure management for more than 25 years in the United States and abroad.  His current research interests include: large-scale infrastructure systems simulation, robust maintenance policies, optimal resource allocations, and innovative financing mechanisms for infrastructure systems, and infrastructure resilience.  

  • Thursday, September 1, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Patricia Mokhtarian (Georgia Institute of Technology)Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Patricia Mokhtarian, Susan G. and Christopher D. Pappas Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Mokhtarian will be speaking on the topic of "Well-being and Travel: Retrospect and Prospect".

    Although the improvement of well-being is often an implicitly-assumed goal of many, if not most, policies, the study of subjective well-being (SWB) and travel has so far been confined to a relatively small segment of the travel behavior community.  Accordingly, one main purpose of this talk is to introduce a larger share of the community to some fundamental SWB-related concepts and their application in transportation research, with the goal of attracting others to this rewarding area of study.  At the same time, however, I also hope to offer some useful reflections to those already working in this field.  After presenting some basic issues of terminology and measurement of SWB, I present four conceptual models relating travel and subjective well-being.  Following one of those models, I review five ways in which travel can influence well-being.  I conclude by examining some challenges associated with assessing the impacts of travel on well-being, as well as challenges associated with applying what we learn to policy.

    Patricia Mokhtarian is the Susan G and Christopher D Pappas Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech.  Prior to joining Tech in 2013, she spent 23 years at the University of California, Davis, where she was a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, associate director of the Institute of Transportation Studies, and founding chair of the interdisciplinary MS/PhD program in Transportation Technology and Policy.  Dr. Mokhtarian has specialized in the study of travel behavior for more than 30 years, and has authored or co-authored more than 200 refereed journal articles, technical reports, and other publications.  She is the current chair of the International Association for Travel Behaviour Research.  She is a North American area editor of the journal Transportation, and is on the editorial boards of Transportation Research Part A, Transport Policy, Transportation Letters, the International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, the European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, and Travel Behavior and Society.  Her PhD is from Northwestern University.  Dr. Mokhtarian's Google Scholar profile may be seen at: http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=84jTPKEAAAAJ.

  • Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Hani S. Mahmassani, William A. Patterson Distinguished Chair in Transportation at Northwestern University, and Director of the Northwestern University Transportation Center. 

    This presentation consists of two parts. In the first part, we discuss market adoption of autonomous vehicles, and how to incorporate their impact in transportation planning models. In the second part, the traffic flow implications of different adoption rates are examined using a microscopic modeling framework of mixed traffic streams in which certain fractions of the vehicles are respectively autonomous, connected or both. We jointly model the properties of the peer-to-peer communication systems for different levels of message content. The framework is used in an exploratory analysis of the flow characteristics of the resulting mixed traffic stream, with particular attention to throughput and stability.

    Dr. Hani S. Mahmassani holds the William A. Patterson Distinguished Chair in Transportation at Northwestern University, where he is the Director of the Northwestern University Transportation Center. He has over 30 years of professional, academic and research experience in the areas of intelligent transportation systems, freight and logistics systems, multimodal systems modeling and optimization, pedestrian and crowd dynamics and management, traffic science, demand forecasting and travel behavior, information technology and mobile social networking, and real-time operation of transportation and distribution systems. He has served as principal investigator on over 140 funded research projects sponsored by international, national, state, and metropolitan agencies and private industry. He is past editor-in-chief and current associate editor of Transportation Science, senior editor of IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems, and founding associate editor of Transportation Research C: Emerging Technologies. He has served in an advisory capacity to various institutes and programs, and has performed several program assessments of leading international research institutes and corporate R&D departments. He is emeritus member of Transportation Research Board committees on travel behavior analysis, telecommunications and travel behavior, and network modeling. Mahmassani received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in transportation systems and his MS in transportation engineering from Purdue University.

  • Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Cynthia Chen, Associate Professor in Transportation Engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle. Dr. Chen will be speaking on the topic of "From warnings to awareness and actions: Understanding resilience through the lens of human activities". 

    The coastal areas of the United State, especially those densely populated, are increasingly threatened by hurricanes at North Atlantic. Understanding how the general public responds to a disaster warning is critical for improving preparedness and mitigating hurricane impacts. Existing efforts in understanding warning responses are mostly based on the assumption that the process of warning responses involves a psychological stage (public awareness) and a behavioral stage (public actions) in a linear, sequential fashion. However, there is little empirical evidence supporting this assumption. We introduce a network-based approach to detect public awareness and actions, and characterize how warning responses evolve from warnings to public awareness and public actions. Changes in online-social-interaction patterns and human mobility patterns are established as metrics of public awareness and public actions respectively, and we employ various network structures (e.g. motifs and assortativity) to quantify online social interactions and human mobility from a life-cycle perspective. This methodology is applied to the case of Hurricane Sandy in New York City, utilizing vast amount of Twitter records and publicly available transportation data including subway ridership and detailed taxi trip records as the gateway toward understanding public awareness and public actions. Our findings reveal that public awareness and public actions could potentially occur during the same time interval, or the previously assumed linear, sequential process may not be universally true. Implications of our findings on disaster research effort and relevant policy making are discussed.

    Cynthia Chen is an associate professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle (UW). She received her PhD in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California, Davis in 2001. Prior to joining UW, she taught for six years from 2003 to 2009 in the City College of New York as an assistant professor. She directs the THINK (Transportation-Human Interaction and Network Knowledge) lab at the UW, and the research conducted at the lab centers around three inter-connected themes: travel behavior (aka human mobility) analysis, resilient infrastructures, and their intersections. Studying these related themes allows her group to explore the sustainability and resilience of a city through the lens of human beings interacting with the physical environment. The knowledge and insights generated can be used in city planning, infrastructure development and policy design. She has published 50 peer-reviewed journal publications in leading journals in transportation, urban planning, public health and infrastructure systems. Her research has been supported by both federal (NSF, NIH, APAR-E, NIST, FHWA) and state agencies (state and city DOTs and regional MPOs).

  • Thursday, April 14, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Eric Huang, Assistant Professor at Clemson University. Dr. Huang will be speaking on the topic of "Optimization of Modern Transportation Systems under Large-scale Complexity, Uncertainty, and Dynamics". 

    Transportation systems have been becoming much more sophisticated than ever before, largely driven by a rapid urbanization process and the increasing availability of large-scale data crowdsourced from the emerging technologies. The worldwide urbanization now requires the creation of more sustainable approaches to mitigate the effects of climate change and to manage large urban population centers. The transportation sector, which is perhaps the most important industry for a modern society, is facing a grand challenge regarding the evolution of a new energy source to reduce the dependence on oil with a concurrent improvement in air quality. Recent technological advances in alternative fuel vehicles and mobility are perhaps the greatest result of that continuing evolution.

    This talk will present Huang's progressive research in understanding the large-scale complexity, uncertainty, and dynamics in the modern transport networks and integrating such effects into the optimization of the transportation systems. In particular, the large-scale complexity rises with real-world sized transport networks and is further complicated by the increasingly available mobility data. Both uncertainty and dynamics are inevitable in the development and management of transportation networks that are expected to be sustainable, resilient, and adaptive to the technological and societal changes for a long-term planning as well as real-time decisions for accommodating random demands that are over space and time.

    An interdisciplinary set of methodologies and techniques has been used in my research, including optimization techniques (e.g., stochastic programming, dynamic programming, and robust optimization), optimization solution methods (e.g., decomposition and heuristic based solutions for improved solution efficiency), geographic information systems (GIS), microeconomics, simulations, and human behavior analysis, which enables to readily explore a wide range of transportation applications. This talk will demonstrate a few exemplary applications in transport energy systems, transportation infrastructure retrofit schemes, alternative mobility network development, and crowdsourced urban delivery systems. 

    Dr. Huang has been an assistant professor in Civil Engineering at Clemson University since 2011. His research focuses on formulation and solutions of complex transport networks and on bridging the gap between the theory and practice for real-world large-scale transportation-infrastructure-energy problems. Dr. Huang uses a variety of optimization techniques and optimization solution methods in his research, coupled with geographic information systems (GIS), microeconomics, and simulations. He has been active in transportation and operations research communities in publishing in leading academic journals, serving as a guest editor of Transportation Research, Part C for special issues on alternative fuel vehicle transport systems, and chairing technical sessions in national and international conferences. He is a member of the TRB and INFORMS. Dr. Huang received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering with minor in Applied Mathematics from University of California, Davis in 2010, M.S. in Transportation Engineering from the National University of Singapore in 2005, and B.S. in Civil Engineering from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China in 2003. Prior to be on the faculty of Clemson, he was a Senior Associate of Energy Systems Modeling at the International Resource Group, a consulting firm for international development, in Washington D.C.

     

  • Thursday, April 7, 2016 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Daniel A. Rodriguez, Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Community Design and Adjunct Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Rodriguez will be speaking on the topic of "The Path Taken: Built Environment and Walking Route Choices". 

    Studying the paths that pedestrian take is important to refine our understanding of what motivates and facilitates active travel modes. In his talk, Profesor Rodríguez will present a study of the influence of the built environment on pedestrian path selection among adolescent girls. Portable global positioning system units, accelerometers, and travel diaries were used to identify the origin, destination, and walking paths of girls in San Diego, California, and Minneapolis, Minnesota. An inventory of the built environment was used to characterize the built environment of paths taken and not taken. Route-level variables covering four key conceptual built environment categories (incivilities, destinations, functionality, and safety) were used in the analysis of path choice. As expected, shorter distance had the strongest positive association with path choice. However, well-maintained sidewalks, the presence of a greenway or trail, of pedestrian safety infrastructure, and of destinations along a path were also consistently positively associated with path choice. The results suggest that it may be possible to encourage pedestrians to walk farther by providing high-quality and stimulating routes. Implications for city and transportation planning will be discussed.

    Daniel A. Rodríguez is Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Community Design in the Department of City and Regional Planning, Director of the Center for Sustainable Community Design, a unit within the Institute for the Environment, and Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research focuses on the reciprocal relationship between the built environment and transportation, and its effects on the environment and health. He has authored 90 peer-reviewed publications and co-authored the book Urban Land Use Planning (University of Illinois Press). In addition to his academic work, Dr. Rodríguez has consulted with numerous city and national governments on sustainable mobility and urban development throughout Latin America, Africa, China, and the U.S.

  • Thursday, March 31, 2016 - 8:00am to Friday, April 1, 2016 - 5:00pm
    University of Tennessee Conference Center Building, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee

    The 2016 University Transportation Center Conference for the Southeastern Region will be hosted by the Southeastern Transportation Center UTC and the University of Tennessee Knoxville. The event will take place on March 31 and April 1, 2016, in the heart of downtown Knoxville. 

    In the words of its organizers, "this innovative conference will bring together faculty, students, practitioners, and public agencies in the southeast to showcase recent achievements and collaborations. The program promises to be a fast-paced and engaging opportunity to share where we've been and where we're going in transportation research, education, and tech transfer". 

    The Conference will take place at the University of Tennessee Conference Center Building, located at 600 Henley Street, Knoxville, TN. 

    To view more information on the Conference, please visit the Southeastern Transportation Center's webpage. More information will be available soon, so please be sure to check back with us. 

  • Thursday, March 10, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Imad L. Al-Qadi, P.E., Dist. M. ASCE, Professor of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Founder and Director of the Illinois Center for Transportation, and Director of the Advanced Transportation Research and Engineering Laboratory. Dr. Al-Qadi will be speaking on the topic of "The Future of Flexible Pavement Sustainability".

    Sustainable transportation is vital to ensure a future that preserves all three aspects of the triple bottom line: environment, economy, and society. In 2011, the transportation sector was responsible for approximately 28% of the total energy consumption and greenhouse gases emissions in the U.S. While the majority of these environmental impacts are emitted from vehicles, infrastructure also plays a large role in the environmental footprint of the transportation sector with direct implications on the vehicles traversing it. The future of pavement sustainability must be holistic. Thus, the pursuit of a sustainable pavement system requires a life-cycle approach, where each life-cycle stage of a pavement can be defined, evaluated, and optimized with respect to its environmental impacts.

    In this presentation, the life cycle phases of a pavement system will be discussed; including the environmental impacts of using innovative techniques and more efficient processes at each phase to quantify and identify sustainable strategies. The use phase is the most complex of the life-cycle stages that includes the relationship between the tire, vehicle, and pavement. Rolling resistance is directly related to fuel consumptions and is affected by characteristics of tire and pavement. In addition to discussing pavement life cycle assessment, tire characteristics and pavement’s texture, roughness, and structure and their impact on fuel consumption and emissions will be presented.

    Professor Al-Qadi is the Founder Professor of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is also the Director of the Advanced Transportation Research and Engineering Laboratory (ATREL) and the founding Director of the Illinois Center for Transportation (ICT). Prior to that, he was the Charles E. Via, Jr. Professor at Virginia Tech. A registered professional engineer, Professor Al-Qadi has authored/ coauthored around 600 publications and has delivered more than 550 presentations including numerous keynote lectures. He has led more than 100 projects to completion; in addition, he is managing more than 60 projects annually as an ICT director since 2006. He is the past president of the ASCE T&DI Board of Governors and the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Pavement Engineering. Professor Al-Qadi has received numerous prestigious national and international honors and awards including the NSF Young Investigator Award, the quadrennial IGS Award, the ASCE James Laurel Prize, the ARTBA Steinberg Award, the ASCE Turner Award, and the French Limoges Medal. He is a Chapter Honorary Member of Chi Epsilon at the University of Illinois, an Honorary Member of the Societa Italiana Infrastructure Viarie, Emeritus Member of TRB Committee AHD25 on Sealants and Fillers for Joints and Cracks, and an Honorary Professor at several universities in Europe and China. In 2010 he was elected as an ASCE Distinguished Member. Dr. Al-Qadi holds a B.S. degree from Yarmouk University and M.Eng. and Ph.D. degrees from Penn State University, all in civil engineering. His expertise on highway and airfield pavement mechanics and evaluation, tire-pavement interaction, GPR, asphalt rheology, pavement sustainability, and forensic engineering and arbitration.

     

  • Wednesday, March 9, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Engineered Biosystems Building

    The Georgia Tech School of Civil and Environmental Engineering invites you to a Kenneth Hyatt Distinguished Alumni Speaker Series on Wednesday, March 9, 2016.

    The event will feature Charles "Wick" Moorman, BSCE 1975, Retired Chairman and CEO of the Norfolk Southern Corporation. 

  • Thursday, March 3, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason Building, Room 1133

    Dr. Asad J. Khattak, Beaman Professor and Transportation Program Coordinator at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will be speaking on this March 3rd Transportation Speaker Series event, on the topic of "The Role of Connected and Automated Vehicles: How Can Urban Areas Use the Data They Create?".

    Dr. Asad J. Khattak is Beaman Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville and Transportation Program Coordinator in the Department. He is affiliated with the UT Center for Transportation Research, where he works on projects related to the Southeastern Transportation Center and NURail University Transportation Center. He has established the Initiative for Sustainable Mobility, a campus-wide organized research unit. Dr. Khattak’s research focuses on various types of innovations related to intelligent transportation systems, transportation safety, and sustainable transportation. Dr. Khattak received his Masters and Ph.D. degrees in Civil Engineering from Northwestern University in 1988 and 1991, respectively. Dr. Khattak is: 1) Editor of Science Citation Indexed Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems, with a 2-year impact factor of 1.377 in 2014. 2) Associate Editor of SCI-indexed International Journal of Sustainable Transportation (IF = 2.548).

    With increasing attention focused on connected and automated vehicles, this presentation will discuss the opportunities and challenges for their development and deployment. How can they transform various processes in the transportation system, especially through the data they generate? Will they have a profound impact on mobility, safety and the environment? We will present a framework for analysis and demonstrate the use of modeling and simulation techniques. We will discuss work undertaken in a National Science Foundation sponsored study on how higher driving volatility, e.g., hard accelerations or hard braking relates to mobility, safety and the environment. The implications of our analysis for travel behavior changes, future vehicle use, and transportation system performance will be discussed.

  • Thursday, February 11, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Chandra Bhat, P.E., Director of the Center for Transportation Research, University Distinguished Teaching Professor, and Adnan Abou-Ayyash Centennial Professor in Transportation Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Bhat will be speaking on the topic of "Capturing Cause-Effect Relationships in Multidimensional Integrated Models: A New Econometric Approach with Application to Residential, Auto Ownership, and Activity Choices". 

    The interest in integrated model systems has been spurred by the recent availability of high-dimensional heterogeneous data with complex dependence structures, thanks to technology that allows the collection and archival of voluminous amounts of data (“big data”). Unlike standard correlated linear data that can be analyzed using traditional multivariate linear regression models, the presence of non-commensurate outcomes creates difficulty because of the absence of a convenient multivariate distribution to jointly (and directly) represent the relationship between discrete and continuous outcomes. This presentation will discuss a generalized heterogeneous data model (GHDM) that jointly handles mixed types of dependent variables, including multiple discrete-continuous (MDC) outcomes, nominal outcomes, ordinal variables, count variables, and continuous variables, by representing the covariance relationships among them through a reduced number of latent factors. The maximum approximate composite marginal likelihood (MACML) method will be discussed to estimate this jointly mixed model system, along with an application to examine residential self-selection in the context of an activity-based modeling (ABM) paradigm. In particular, we jointly model residential location-related choices (density of residential location and commute distance), along with auto ownership and activity time-use, in a way that has a social-psychological underpinning through latent variables while also explicitly considering residential self-selection issues. Our results support the presence of self-selection effects (endogeneity), and suggest that modeling the different choice processes independently does not capture true relationships that exist across the choice dimensions. This is also evidenced in the treatment effect measures, which emphasize that accounting for residential self-selection effects are not simply esoteric econometric pursuits, but can have important implications for land-use policy measures that focus on neo-urbanist design.

    From a methodological standpoint, we hope that the elegant way of tying the mixed types of dependent variables, including an MDC variable, through a parsimonious latent structure approach will open new doors in the exploration of the nexus between land use and activity-based travel modeling, as well as contribute to empirical research in many other fields where MDC variables occur frequently.

    Dr. Chandra R. Bhat is the Director of the Center for Transportation Research (CTR) and the Adnan Abou-Ayyash Centennial Professor in Transportation Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, where he has a joint appointment between the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (CAEE) and the Department of Economics. Substantively, Bhat has contributed to the area of transportation and urban policy design, with far reaching implications for public health, energy dependence, greenhouse gas emissions, and societal quality of life. Methodologically, he has been a pioneer in the formulation and use of statistical and econometric methods to analyze human choice behavior.

  • Thursday, January 21, 2016 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for this Transportation Speaker Series event, featuring Dr. Venu Madhav Garikapati, Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

    Dr. Garikapati will be speaking on the topic of  "Activity Patterns, Time Use, and Travel of Millenials: A Generation in Transition?". Millenials constitute the largest population segment in the United States. Compared to previous generations, they are found to travel less, own fewer cars, have lower drivers' licensure rates, and use alternative modes more. But to what extent will these differences persist as millenials move through various phases of the lifecycle? This talk explores this question using the repeated cross-sectional data from the American Time Use Survey. Preliminary findings suggest that time-use differences between millenials and the prior generation are likely to fade with age. Millenials may exhibit a lag in adopting the patterns of predecessor generations due to delayed lifecycle milestones (e.g., completing their education, getting jobs, moving out of their parents' homes, marrying, and having children); in the mean time, substantial sustainability benefits may accrue because of this lag.

    Venu Garikapati is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering, with a specializastion in Transportation Systems, from Arizona State University, and his master's degree in Civil Engineering  from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay. Venu's research is focused on the development of new analytical and computational model systems for forecasting activity-travel demand under a wide variety of socio-economic, demographic, technological, multimodal, built environment, and policy scenarios. His dissertation research dealt with the development of novel operational agent-based modeling frameworks to predict activity-travel patterns of individuals, and the mix of vehicle types owned by households. 

  • Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - 5:30pm to 8:00pm
    Sixth Engine, 438 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, D.C., 20001

    Georgia Tech and NCTSPM and its member universities are pleased to announce that they will host a reception at the Transportation Research Board's 95th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

  • Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for the last Transportation Speaker Series Event of the Fall semester, featuring Dr. Christian Claudel, Associate Professor in the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at the University of Texas.

    Dr. Claudel will be speaking on the topic of "Network Traffic State Estimation Using Hamilton-Jacobi Equations". This talk describes a framework for solving control and estimation problems in systems modeled by scalar conservation laws with convex flux, with applications to highway traffic flow estimation and control. Using an equivalent Hamilton-Jacobi formulation, we show that the  be solution to the original PDE can be written semi-analytically. Using the properties of the solutions to HJ PDEs, we prove that when the data of the problem is prescribed in piecewise affine form, the constraints of the model are mixed integer linear. This property enables us to solve arbitrary network state estimation problems involving any type of measurement data (density, flow, velocity and travel time) exactly and efficiently. This framework is applied to a network traffic state estimation problem involving experimental data.

    Christian Claudel is an Assistant Professor of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at UT-Austin. He received the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from UC-Berkeley in 2010, and the MS degree in Plasma Physics from Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon in 2004. He received the Leon Chua Award from UC-Berkeley in 2010 for his work on the Mobile Millennium traffic monitoring system. His research interests include control and estimation of distributed parameter systems, wireless sensor networks and unmanned aerial vehicles.

  • Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Dr. Susan Tighe, PE, Canada Research Chair in Pavement and Infrastructure Management, Norman W. McLeod Professor in Sustainable Pavement Engineering, Founding Member and Director of the Centre for Pavement and Transportation Technology, and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Waterloo in Canada, will be speaking at this Transportation Speaker Series event, on the topic of "Incorporating Sustainability into Transportation Asset Management: Our Future Depends on It!". 

    Currently, public agencies around the world are investigating the feasibility of incorporating sustainability into transportation asset management. The potential benefits are diverse and of strategic importance as they encompass improvements to virgin material use, alternative material usage, pavement in-serving monitoring and management, noise, air and water quality, and energy usage. The presentation will provide a framework for formally incorporating sustainability into pavement engineering.

    Professor Susan Tighe is a Canada Research Chair in Pavement and Infrastructure Management, Norman W. McLeod Professor in Sustainable Pavement Engineering, Founding Principal and Director of the Centre for Pavement and Transportation Technology, and a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Waterloo. She has been a registered Professional Engineer in the Province of Ontario since 1995. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Queen’s University, and a master’s and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of WaterlooShe has worked in both academia and industry, including a stint with the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario, and has also spent time abroad, working in Australia and serving as an Erskine Fellow at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. She also held a United Kingdon Royal Academy of Engineering Fellowship at the University of Nottingham in England, and she led the development of the 2013 Pavement Asset Design and Management Guide, the principal pavement design guide for Canada.

     

  • Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    On Thursday, October 29, NCTSPM will welcome Dr. Srinivas Peeta to the Transporation Speaker Series. Dr. Peeta is a Professor of Civil Engineering in the Transportation and Infrastructure Systems group of the Lyles School of Civil Engineering at Purdue University, as well as serving as the Director of the NEXTRANS Center. He will be speaking on the topic of "Modeling the Information Flow Propagation Wave under Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communications".

    Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications under the connected vehicle context have the potential to provide new paradigms to enhance the safety, mobility and environmental sustainability of surface transportation. Understanding how the information propagates in space and time is a key aspect for V2V communications based applications. Most existing analytical models assume instantaneous propagation of information flow through multi-hop communications. It ignores the spatiotemporal interactions between the traffic flow dynamics and V2V communication constraints. This study proposes a macroscopic two-layer model to characterize the information flow propagation wave (IFPW). The traffic flow propagation is formulated in the lower layer  as a system of partial differential equations based on a multi-class Lighthill-Whitham-Richards model. Due to their conceptual similarities, the upper layer adapts and modifies a spatial Susceptible-Infected epidemics model to describe information dissemination between V2V-equipped vehicles using integro-differential equations. A closed-form solution is derived for the IFPW speed under homogeneous traffic conditions. The IFPW speed is numerically determined for heterogeneous traffic conditions. Numerical experiments illustrate the influence of traffic density heterogeneity on the IFPW speed. The proposed model can capture the spatiotemporal interactions between the traffic and V2V communication layers, and aid in the design of novel information propagation strategies to manage traffic conditions.

    Dr. Srinivas Peeta is a Professor of Civil Engineering at Purdue University and the Director of the NEXTRANS Center, the USDOT’s Region 5 University Transportation Center. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Caltech and University of Texas at Austin, respectively. He is the immediate past Chair of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Transportation Network Modeling. He has authored over 225 refereed articles in journals and conference proceedings, and has over 440 invited and/or international conference talks. He serves on the editorial boards of Transportation Research Part B, Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems, Transportmetrica B: Transport Dynamics, and Transportation in Developing Economies, and is the Area Editor for Transportation Dynamics for Networks and Spatial Economics. He serves on the Advisory Board of the Korean Society of Civil Engineering Journal of Civil Engineering. He has received more than US $30 million in sponsored research funding. Some of his awards include the INFORMS Transportation Science Dissertation award, NSF CAREER award, the ASCE Walter Huber Prize, and paper awards (from TRB, IEEE and other conferences). Five dissertations supervised by Dr. Peeta received best dissertation awards from the Council of University Transportation Centers and the International Association for Travel Behavior Research. His research interests are multidisciplinary and broadly span transportation and infrastructure systems.

     

  • Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    NCTSPM will co-host Dr. Aaron Steinfeld of Carnegie Mellon University with the Georgia Tech Robotics Club on October 22, 2015, for a Transportation Speaker Series event. Dr. Steinfeld is an Associate Research Professor with Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science and its Robotics Institute. He will be speaking on the topic of "Crowsourcing for Public Transit Users of All Abilities". 

    In recent years, there has been a renewed focus on technologies that improve quality of life for older adults and people with disabilities. When combined with universal design, these technologies provide value to all users and lead to a larger societal impact. Crowdsourcing allows users to help each other and enhance technology functionality. This talk will demonstrate how to mix technology, crowdsourcing, and universal design to enhance quality of life.

    Public transit is critical to daily life and is usually accessible in the United States due to the Americans with Disabilities Act and other regulations. However, important information, services, and functionality are often missing due to limited staffing or available technology. I will describe research activity by our team to address these challenges, the most prominent of which is Tiramisu Transit, a publicly deployed crowdsourcing app designed to provide key real-time transit information for people with disabilities. 

    Dr. Aaron Steinfeld is an Associate Research Professor in the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his BSE, MSE, and Ph.D. degrees in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan, and completed postdoctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the Co-Director of the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Accessible Public Transportation, Director of the DRRP on Inclusive Cloud and Web Computing, and the area lead for transportation-related projects in the Quality of Life Center. His research focuses on operator assistance under constraints, such as how to enable timely and appropriate interaction when technology use is restricted, through design, tasks, the environment, time pressures, or user abilities. His work includes intelligent transportation systems, crowdsourcing, human-robot interaction, rehabilitation, and universal design. 

  • Tuesday, October 6, 2015 - 8:00am to Thursday, October 8, 2015 - 8:00pm
    Orlando, Florida

    The University of Central Florida and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville,  will be hosting the 2015 Road Safety & Simulation International Conference in Orlando, Florida, from October 6th through 8th. The conference will cover topics ranging from driving simulation, big data, and safety modelling, to traffic microsimulation, emerging technologies, and vehicle automation. Since its inception in Rome, Italy, in 2007, the RSS conferences have made a practice of showcasing advancements in traffic simulation and driving simulations, and introducing new ideas and concepts. 

    The conference will feature keynote speakers such as Dr. Peter A. Hancock, Sc.D., Ph.D., of the Unviersity of Central Florida, Dr. C. Y. David Yang of the Federal Highway Administration, and Jeff Greenberg of the Ford Motor Company. Hancock is the Provost Distinguished Research Professor of Psychology, the Institute for Simulation and Training, and the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Industrial Engineering and Management Systems at the University of Central Florida, and Yang is the Human Factors Team Leader in the FHWA's Office of Safety Research and Development. Greenberg is a Senoir Technical Leader with Ford's Research and Advanced Engineering Group. 

    Currently, over 100 podium presentations and over 80 posters have been scheduled to be presented. More information will be available soon, along with a conference program.

    Online registration is still available, with a discounted price available for students. Day-of registration will be available, with a higher cost.

    To register, please click here

    To download a conference flyer, click here. 

  • Thursday, October 1, 2015 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Dr. Steve Dickerson, Professor Emeritus at Georgia Tech  and founder of RideCell, LLC, will be speaking at the NCTSPM Transportation Speaker Series on October 1, on the topic of "A Comprehensive Urban Transportation App". 

    The presentation describes a way to considerably reduce urban congestion in major cities. The key is “a comprehensive app” or “master app” that allows smart phone owners to execute their urban trips in a way that is best for them and considers the benefit to others who might travel at a similar time. A 2004 patent, owned by Georgia Tech, describes the technology to achieve the objective at a low economic cost. The party implementing the comprehensive app should be a consortium of private and public entities. 

    Dr. Dickerson was a Professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech until his retirement in 1996. He has founded several different successful robotics companies, including the Modnar Corporation, DVT Corporation, CAMotion, Inc., RideCell, LLC, and SoftWear Automation, Inc. 

    Ridecell provides more efficient use of transportation resources and improved customer experience through using advanced communication techniques between vehicles and their drivers. SoftWear, his other early-stage venture, is working to introduce disruptive solutions in garment cutting and sewing. 

  • Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 9:30am
    Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA

    TransportationCamp South will return to Atlanta on Saturday, September 26th, 2015. 

    The "unconference" brings together professionals and laypeople with an interest in transportation for a day of connection and creation, where sessions will be proposed and led by attendees. With its enormous success in the last two years, organizers are optimistic about this year's event.

    It will be held in the Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons on the Georgia Institute of Technology campus. Tickets are limited, with sales ending on August 31, and may be purchased on Eventbrite. More information is also available on the Eventbrite page, including a schedule of events. 

    Advanced registration ends August 31.

    Photos from TransportationCamp South 2014 and 2013

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  • Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for our second Transportation Speaker Series event of the fall semester. Dr. Lucio Soibelman, Professor and Chair of the Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Southern California, will be the guest speaker. 

    Dr. Soibelman's research and professional interest include information technology usage and support for economic development and construction management, advanced infrastructure systems, sensors and sensor networks, and process integration in the development of large-scale engineering systems.

  • Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 11:00am
    One Georgia Center (600 W. Peachtree St NW, Atlanta, GA)

    On Tuesday, September 22, 2015, the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) and the Georgia Transportation Institute (GTI) will jointly host the third annual GDOT/GTI Transportation Research Expo.

    The event will be held at GDOT headquarters, One Georgia Center, at 600 West Peachtree Street NW in Atlanta. All transportation researchers at GTI's member universities, including Georgia Tech, the University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Kennessaw State University, Mercer University, Savannah State University, and Albany State University are invited to display their active and recently-completed research projects sponsored by GDOT.

    Please RSVP to GTI@ce.gatech.edu if you plan to attend. 

    To view a poster gallery of all posters from the 2013 and 2014 poster session, click here.

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  • Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 11:00am
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133
     
    Join NCTSPM for our second Transportation Speaker Series event of the fall semester. Dr. Jidong Yang, Assistant Professor in Civil and Construction Engineering at Kennesaw State University, will be the guest speaker. He will be speaking on the topic of "Understanding the Varying Performance of Vehicle Detectors for Traffic Signal Control". 

    Traffic signal control systems largely define the efficiency of urban roadway networks and drivers’ experience with their road trips. The recent advancement of sensors and wireless communication technologies has elevated the way that traffic signals are being operated and has accelerated the deployment of traffic-responsive and adaptive traffic control systems. These “smart” systems are designed to deliver higher efficiency in handling ever-changing traffic, conditional upon accurate and reliable detection of vehicles using the systems. Given the availability of various vehicle detection technologies, which exhibit varying performance depending on specific situations or contexts, understanding these underlying factors in critical.

    A professional engineer with extensive research and industry experience, Yang has a special interest in interdisciplinary work. His research has focused on areas including pavement management and performance modelling, intelligent transportation systems (ITS), traffic operations and simulations, and highway safety.

    Please RSVP to NCTSPM@ce.gatech.edu if you plan to attend. 

  • Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 11:00am
    Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM on Thursday, September 10, as Dr. Alex Karner, Assistant Professor in Georgia Tech's School of City and Regional Planning, will be speaking on the topic of "The Convergence of Social Equity and Environmental Sustainability: Jobs-Housing Fit and Commute Distance". 

    Please RSVP to NCTSPM@ce.gatech.edu if you plan to attend. 

    Dr. Karner received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California, Davis, and completed postdoctoral work at Arizona State University. His research investigates how publicly available data can best be used to understand the performance of integrated transportation-land use system in the areas of public health, environmental justice, and environmental sustainability. He regularly partners with civil rights attorneys and affordable housing advocates to ensure that his results are used to inform policy and planning efforts. 

    Researchers have long argued that achieving a rough balance between the number of jobs and housing units in a local area can improve transportation performance. Given the complexity of factors shaping commute patterns, however, evidence of a relationship between jobs-housing balance and travel patterns has been less robuts. recent advances in data availability have enabled a more sophisticated examination of the fit between jobs and housing in local areas, not just the balance. In this talk, Dr. Karner will describe the development of a low-wage jobs/affordable housing fit metric using publicly available data sources and its application to the study of commute distances across all census tracks in California. While there are some limits to this data, we find that the obs-housing fit measure is strongly correlated with lower commute distances, including when controlling for a range of other appropriate variables.  

  • Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Dr. Yinhai Wang, Professor at the University of Washington at Seattle and Director of the STAR Lab and PacTrans, will be speaking on "Big-Data-Driven Transportation Decision Making in the Smart Cities Context". 

    ABSTRACT: 

    Transportation involves human, infrastructure, vehicle, and environmental interactions and is therefore a very complicated system.  Transportation activities are found affecting public health, air quality, sustainability, etc., and thus tie to everyone’s daily life and are critical for achieving goals of Smart Cities. Traditionally, transportation has been studied through classical methods, typically with ideal assumptions, limited data support, and poor computing resources. While the theories (such as traffic flow and driver behavior models) developed through these efforts provide valuable insights in understanding transportation-related issues, they are often ineffective in large-scale transportation system analysis with massive amount of data from various sources.

    With recent advances in sensing, networking, and computing technologies, more and more cities have launched their smart cities plans to improve quality of life, sustainability, efficiency, and productivity. Sensor networks are fundamental elements of smart cities and the data they produce have the potential of generating the intelligence needed to make urban transportation smarter. We expect that many new transportation-related data and computational resources will become available in the smart cities context. These new assets are likely to bring in new opportunities to understand transportation systems better and address those critical transportation issues in a faster, more accountable, and more cost-effective way. To take advantage of these big data, a new theoretical framework and its supporting platform are clearly needed to integrate the quickly growing massive amount of data, typically from numerous sources of varying spatial and temporal characteristics, into the large-scale transportation problem solving and decision making processes. Efforts along this line are likely to form up a new subject area, namely e-science of transportation, in the years to come. Through his talk, the speaker will share his vision and pilot research on extracting transportation big data streams from the smart cities sensor networks and demonstrate the values of these data in large-scale system analysis and decision support through an online regional-map-based data platform named Digital Roadway Interactive Visualization and Evaluation Network (DRIVE Net).

    BIO: 

    Dr. Yinhai Wang is a professor in transportation engineering and the founding director of the Smart Transportation Applications and Research Laboratory (STAR Lab) at the University of Washington (UW). He also serves as director for Pacific Northwest Transportation Consortium (PacTrans), USDOT University Transportation Center for Federal Region 10. Dr. Wang has a Ph.D. in transportation engineering from the University of Tokyo (1998) and a master's degree in computer science from the UW. Dr. Wang’s active research fields include traffic sensing, smart transportation systems, e-science of transportation, transportation safety, etc.

    Dr. Wang has actively involved in numerous research projects and received over $53 million of research funds as principal investigator over the past fifteen years. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, three edited books, one book chapter, and nearly 50 peer-reviewed conference papers. To disseminate research findings, he has delivered over 100 invited talks and nearly 200 other academic presentations.

    Dr. Wang serves as a member of the Transportation Information Systems and Technology Committee and Highway Capacity and Quality of Service Committee of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). He is currently on the Board of Governors for the ASCE Transportation & Development Institute and a member of the steering committee for the IEEE Smart Cities. He was an elected member of the Board of Governors for the IEEE ITS Society from 2010 to 2013. Additionally, Dr. Wang is associate editor for three journals: Journal of ITS, Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering, and Journal of Transportation Engineering. He was the winner of the ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering Best Paper Award for 2003. He is also a conference co-chair for the 2015 IEEE International Smart Cities Conference to be held in Guadalajara, Mexico from October 25 to 28 2015.

  • Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    Join us for Dr. Omar Smadi's presentation on "Asset Management: a New Approach to Decision Making."

    Dr. Smadi has over 20 years of experience in the area of infrastructure and asset management ranging from pavements, bridges, safety, pavement marking, signs and other infrastructure assets.  Dr. Smadi is an associate professor with the department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at Iowa State University.  Dr. Smadi is the Director of RIMOS (Roadway Information Management Information Systems) program at InTrans and also a research scientist with CTRE. He is currently serving as PI for several research projects for the Iowa Department of Transportation, the Iowa Highway Research Board, the federally funded Midwest Transportation Consortium (MTC), NCHRP, SHRP 2, and FHWA.  He chairs the TRB Committee on Pavement Monitoring and Evaluation and a member of the Pavement Management and Asset Management committees.  Dr. Smadi developed and taught the FHWA Data Integration workshop and NHI’s Asset Management class.  Dr. Smadi manages an annual data collection contract for pavement distress and video log for over 40,000 miles for the state of Iowa and cities and counties in the state. Dr. Smadi was in charge of developing, implementing, and populating the SHRP 2 Roadway Information Database (RID) which contains roadway data from multiple sources and covers over 200,000 miles.

    Abstract: 

    What is asset management? Why should agencies implement asset management? How much does it cost to implement asset management? What is included as part of the asset management implementation process? All these are questions that agencies have to answer before proceeding with a decision to implement AM. MAP-21 changed the dynamics for state DOTs since it mandated the development of risk-based asset management plan (TAMP) that utilizes life cycle cost to develop investment strategies for the preservation and improvement of the highways and bridges on the national highway system (NHS) at a minimum. MAP-21 defines asset management as: a strategic and systematic process of operating, maintaining, and improving physical assets, with a focus on engineering and economic analysis based upon quality information, to identify a structured sequence of maintenance, preservation, repair, rehabilitation, and replacement actions that will achieve and sustain a desired state of good repair over the lifecycle of the assets at minimum practicable cost.

    The AM definition indicates that AM is more than just a system or software. It is a process, a new way of doing business for transportation agencies. The presentation will cover the basics of asset management covering concepts and core questions that asset management need to answer, need for data to support the asset management process and the quality assurance process, decision making utilizing life-cycle cost, performance measures under MAP-21, and risk and its impact on decision making. The presentation will also discuss the requirements of a transportation asset management plan (TAMP) and how it can be utilized to enhance the decision making process.

  • Friday, April 17, 2015 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
    Georgia Tech

    Join NCTSPM and the Georgia section of ITE for a picnic at their monthly meeting. More details will follow soon.

  • Thursday, April 9, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Bldg, Room 1133

    Dr. Daniel Piatkowski, Assistant Professor in Urban Planning at the Savannah State University, will be speaking on "Carrots vs. Sticks: Strategies for increasing walking and cycling in the US."

    ABSTRACT: The standard approach to increasing walking and bicycling mode share in the United States is through encouragement or promotion. But the impact of encouraging and promoting more sustainable transportation choices may be inherently limited. This may explain why, despite concerted efforts to promote active modes of transportation in some US cities, bicycle and pedestrian mode shares remain low. This seminar examines the challenges of significantly increasing bicycle and pedestrian mode shares as an interaction between individual attitudes/perceptions and the environment. I conceptualize existing approaches aimed at encouraging active travel mode share as “carrots” and those that discourage driving as “sticks.”  It may be that carrots in isolation are only modestly effective at impacting mode shift, but the alternative, sticks, carry significant equity concerns and implementation challenges. Prior to considering strategies that discourage driving – the primary alternative to active modes in the US – an evidence base is needed. Existing evidence for comprehensive “carrot and stick” strategies to influence city-scale travel behavior comes mainly from European case studies and is difficult to generalize to the US. This work fills this gap by drawing on data from four US cities. I apply a mixed methods approach to two research questions that are frequently only examined in isolation: (1) are carrots, sticks, or a combination of the two most effective at influencing travel behavior; and (2) what is the difference in terms of ease of implementation between carrots and sticks? 

    BIO:

    Dr. Piatkowski is an interdisciplinary urban planning scholar interested in sustainable, healthy, and active transportation. He received his PhD in Design and Planning from the University of Colorado Denver as a National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education Research Trainee (NSF-IGERT) and a member of the Active Communities Transportation Research Group (actresearchgroup.org). He holds a Master's degree in Urban and Environmental Planning, and a Bachelor's degree in English, both from Arizona State University. Prior to joining the faculty at Savannah State University, he was a Research Associate at the Center for Sustainable Infrastructure Systems at the University of Colorado Denver. Current research projects include: multi-modal conflicts, street design, and travel behavior; historic neighborhoods, preservation, and active transport; social media tools in for sustainable transportation planning.

    To learn more about Dr. Piatkowski, visit his webpage.

  • Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Dr. Geoffrey Whitfield, Epidemic Intellice Service (EIS) Officer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, holds a master's degree in exercise physiology from the University of Texas at Austin and a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Texas School of Public Health. He is currently an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer with the Healthy Community Design Initiative at the CDC's National Center for Environmental Health. His research interests are in transportation-related physical activity and the health effects thereof.

  • Thursday, March 26, 2015 - 9:00am to Friday, March 27, 2015 - 5:00pm
    Hyatt Regency – Birmingham, Alabama

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham and Mississippi State University hosted the University Transportation Centers (UTC) Conference for the Southeastern Region on March 26-27, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency – Wynfrey Hotel in Birmingham, AL. This event sought to bring together faculty, students, practitioners, and public agencies in the southeast to disseminate information about on-going activities at all partner universities and to further enhance collaboration among the academic community and the private and public sector agencies in the region. We are grateful to all who joined us during this event, which was offered at no charge to all transportation professionals.

    Previous Slide 1/15 Next Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC<span style="font-size:10px">&nbsp;Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a></span> Images courtesy of NCITEC<span style="font-size:10px">&nbsp;Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a></span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span> Images courtesy of NCITEC <span style="font-size:10px"> Images courtesy of <a href="http://www.ncitec.msstate.edu/" target="_blank">NCITEC</a> </span>

    Important Information and Links:

  • Thursday, March 5, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for the third event of the Transportation Speaker Series on March 5, 2015. Dr. Ken Laberteaux, Senior Principal Scientist in the Future Mobility Research Department of the Toyota Research Institute of North Ameria, will be speaking. 

    “TRACKING TRANSPORTATION TRENDS: GEN Y, SUBURBS, AND AUTOMATED DRIVING”
    ABSTRACT: Historically the US has been an automobile-driven, suburbanizing nation. According to four national surveys (taken in 1990, 1995, 2001, and 2009), private vehicles accounted for 88-91% of the person miles and 83-89% of the person trips (per person) (Santos 2011). In 2001, 93% of all US households owned at least one vehicle (National Research Council 2009). The 2010 Census indicates US suburban residents now outnumber their city neighbors roughly 2:1. Yet, many predict a very different future, considering new preferences of Gen Y, new transportation options (e.g. car/ride sharing), and new technologies (e.g. automated driving). This talk attempts to make some sense of all of these trends, with several data visualizations of the past, and a few predictions thrown in for fun.

    Dr. Laberteaux received his Master's and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame, focusing on adaptive control for communications. In his 19 years in the automotive and telecommunication industries, he has written 25 scholarly publications and has produced eight patents and fourteen invention disclosures. His research currently focuses on sustainable mobility systems, such as grid-vehicle interactions, vehicle electrification feasibility, security and privacy issues of smart grid, battery lifetime modeling, and U.S. urbanization and transportation patterns. 

  • Thursday, February 5, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for the second Transportation Speaker Series event of the year. Dr. Samer M. Madanat, the Xenel Professor of Engineering, and Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, will be speaking on "Incorporating Environmental Sustainability Objectives in the Planning, Operations and Maintenance of Transportation Systems." 

    Samer Madanat is received a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering from the University of Jordan in 1986, and a M.S and Ph.D. in Transportation Systems from MIT in 1988 and 1991 respectively. His research and teaching interests are in the area of Transportation and Infrastructure Management, with an emphasis on modeling facility performance, the development of optimal management policies under uncertainty, and the integration of sustainability considerations in the transportation management process. He has published extensively in refereed archival journals and conference proceedings.

    In 2000, he received the Science and Technology grant from the University of California Office of the President, an award given annually to one faculty member in the UC system. From 2001 to 2010, he served as the Editor-in-Chief of the ASCE Journal of Infrastructure Systems. He is a member of the editorial board of several technical journals. Many of his former students are faculty members at universities in the US and abroad.

  • Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason Building, Room 1133

    Join NCTSPM for the 2015 Transportation Speaker Series, where Dr. Susan Handy, Director of the Sustainable Transportaiton Center at the University of California at Davis will speak. 

    Dr. Susan Handy is Chair of the Department of Environmental Science and Policy and the Director of the National Center for Sustainable Transportation at the University of California, Davis.  Her research interests center on the relationships between transportation and land use, particularly the impact of neighborhood design on travel behavior.  Her current work focuses on bicycling as a mode of transportation. She is a member of the Committee on Women’s Issues in Transportation of the Transportation Research Board and is an associate editor of the newly launched Journal of Transport and Health. 

  • Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 5:30pm to 8:00pm
    Marriott Marquis Washington DC, Mezzanine Foyer

    Georgia Tech and the National Center for Transportation Systems Productivity and Management (NCTSPM) are hosting a reception at the Transportation Research Board's 94th Annual Meeting. Please join us:
     

     

  • Tuesday, January 13, 2015 - 5:00pm to 8:00pm
    Marriott Marquis Washington, D.C., Mezzanine foyer

    You are cordially invited to the NCTSPM Reception at the 94th annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board in Washington, D.C., on January 13th.

  • Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason Building, Room 1133

    Georgia Tech's Civil & Environmental Engineering Department is pleased to welcome Representative Jay Roberts (R-154)  and Senator Steve Gooch (R-51) to speak on Thursday, November 13 at 11:00 am in Mason 1133.

    Rep. Roberts is the Chairman of the Georgia House of Representative's Transportation Committee, and Sen. Gooch is Chairman of the Georgia Senate's Transportation Committee.  Together, they are currently co-chairing the Joint Study Committee on Critical Transportation Infrastructure Funding. The committee, which was created by HR 1573 as a joint study committee, consists of 16 members. It has been charged to study the conditions, needs, issues and problems of identifying funding sources to provide transportation infrastructure sufficient to maintain and improve Georgia's economic competitiveness and quality of life. Rep. Roberts is also a member of numerous House committees, including: Appropriations, Agriculture & Consumer Affairs,Game, Fish & Parks, and Rules.

    Representative Jay Roberts Senator Steve Gooch

    Sen. Gooch is a member of the Senate Committees on Appropriation, MARTOC, and Natural Resources and the Environment, and he is Vice Chairman of the Economic Development Committee and Ex-Officio of the Rules Committee.

    Click here for a campus map with directions to the Mason building. 

  • Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    “Long Distance and Intercity Travel - Who, what, where, and when?”

     

    We are pleased to welcome Dr. Lisa Aultman-Hall from the University of Vermont on Thursday, November 6 @ 11 am. Dr Aultman-Hall will be delivering a seminar entitled: “Long Distance and Intercity Travel - Who, what, where, and when?”

    All are welcome to attend. Please RSVP to NCTSPM@ce.gatech.edu

     

     

    Lisa Aultman-Hall, Ph.D., is a Professor of the School of Engineering and Transportation Research Center at the University of Vermont. She joined UVM as founding director of the UVM Transportation Research Center in August 2006. She had previously served as the director of the Connecticut Transportation Institute, while an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Aultman-Hall teaches transportation planning and traffic safety. She studied at McMaster University and Queen’s University in Canada. She served as an Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky. She has been funded by NSF, three UTCs from the US DOT and several state DOTs.

    Recent research results include studies of tailpipe emissions, traffic safety (bicyclists, young drivers, old drivers), freight transportation planning, and transportation network robustness. Dr. Aultman-Hall’s current research Interests include the following:

    • Travel Behavior, especially second-by-second driving style, route choice and idling
    • Rural Travel Behavior, including accessibility, efficiency and EV adoption potential
    • Long Distance and Overnight Travel
    • Travel Survey Design
    • Bicycle Transportation
    • Traffic Safety
    • Spatial Analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) for Transportation

    Click here for a campus map with directions to the Mason building. 

  • Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    Join us for a seminar by Eric A. Morris, Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning at Clemson University.

     

    IS TRAVEL REALLY THAT BAD?
    The question of what makes us happy is one of the most ancient in all of philosophical inquiry. But only recently have scholars begun to investigate how travel and transportation contribute to our state of mind and our overall sense of well-being. Professor Morris will discuss research on what kind of mood we're in while we travel, how our mood varies based on mode and trip duration, and how we might go about making ourselves happier travelers.

     

    Eric's primary focus is transportation, particularly how transportation contributes to our quality of life. His current research focuses on transportation and happiness; transportation, time use, and activity patterns; and transportation and access to employment, shopping, food, and medical care. He has a strong interest in transportation equity and disadvantaged populations. He also conducts research in the field of transportation history, and is currently co-authoring a book on the development and financing of the freeway system. Other interests include transportation and land use, transportation finance and economics, transportation policy, and transportation and the environment. He wrote a column on transportation for the New York Times for several years, and now is a regular contributor to the Freakonomics website. He was also the Associate Editor of Access magazine. Before returning to academia he worked as a travel writer, a sports writer, and a television writer and producer.

    Click here for a campus map with directions to the Mason building. 

  • Friday, October 17, 2014 - 12:00pm
    Miami, FL

     

    Dr. Elio R. Espino, P.E., PTOE, recently presented a seminar at Florida International University on the topic of "District 6 FDOT Pedestrian Bicycle and Safety Program." Espino is Senior Project Manager at A&P Consulting, and the seminar was presented on October 17, 2014. 

  • Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason 1133

    Join NCTSPM and Georgia Tech for this exciting, student-centric, consultant brown-bag lunch seminar this October. 

  • Friday, October 10, 2014 - 12:00pm
    Miami, FL

    Florida International Univeristy welcomed Jesus A. Martinez, P.E., Principal Engineer at the Southwest Research Institute on October 10, where he presented on the topic of "Autonomous Vehicles: State of the Practice and Applications."

  • Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason Building, Room 3132

    Join the Women's Transportation Seminar (WTS) at GT to hear from four of Atlanta's top transportation leaders on their careers and keys to success! 

    WTS will host four of the top female transportation leaders in Atlanta for a panel to discuss their experiences ad insights from working in the transportation industry. Panelists will offer perspectives from a variety of roles in transit agencies, county and city governments, and engineering and planning consulting firms. All are welcome to attend, and free lunch will be provided.

    Panel members will include Rukiya Eaddy, Chief of Staff for MARTA, Faye DiMassimo, Director of the Cobb County DOT, Heather Alhadeff, President of Center Forward, and Margie Pozin, Transportation Group Leader for STV. 

    View a flyer for the event. 

    Click here for a campus map with directions to the Mason building. 

  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    Join us for a presentation from Kimley-Horn's Rob Ross and Elizabeth Hammer: "Hitting Curveballs in a Fastball World: The Atlanta Braves DRI Traffic Study"

    Developments of Regional Impact (DRIs) are large-scale developments that are likely to have regional effects beyond the local government jurisdiction in which they are located. 

    The proposed Braves Stadium and Mixed-Use Development will be a substantial, mixed-use development within one of the region’s major employment centers. A regional review of the Braves Stadium and Mixed Use Development was completed in June 2014 (the regional review finding can be viewed here). Kimley-Horn & Associates, Inc. conducted the traffic study for the application for the DRI review. Rob and Elizabeth will discuss their involvement in the project and provide insight into the transportation issues surrounding this exciting and regionally significant project.

     

    Rob Ross, P.E., is a Georgia Tech graduate with nearly 20 years of transportation engineering experience. His work has spanned a wide range of planning and traffic engineering projects, from school crossing studies and local traffic impact studies to regional traffic studies and intelligent transportation system design. His private development experience includes retail, office, residential and mixed use projects, many of which he has coordinated through the state DOT approval processes. Rob has worked on several high-profile transit projects, including bus routing and access for the Multi-Modal Passenger Terminal (MMPT) in downtown Atlanta and corridor selection and operational improvements for the Atlanta BeltLine streetcar segments. Most notably, Rob was responsible for development of the traffic impact analysis of the new Atlanta Braves stadium in Cobb County.

    Elizabeth Hammer, EIT, is a traffic and transportation analyst with Kimley-Horn. An Auburn graduate, her efforts focus primarily on the traffic impacts of private development in the metro Atlanta area. Elizabeth performed much of the traffic analysis on the new Atlanta Braves stadium in Cobb County, determining the impacts the stadium and surrounding development will have on the transportation network. 

    Click here for a campus map with directions to the Mason building. 

  • Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 11:00am to 1:00pm
    One Georgia Center (600 West Peachtree St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308), Rooms 402-404

    The Georgia Department of Transportation and the Georgia Transportation Institute will host a transportation research poster session on Tuesday, September 23, 2014.

    All researchers in the Georgia Transportation Institute (at the Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Southern University, Southern Polytechnic State University, Mercer University, and Albany State University) are invited to display active and recently completed GDOT-sponsored research projects.

    Please RSVP no later than Tuesday, September 10 if you plan to display your work. RSVPs can be sent to audrey.leous@coa.gatech.edu.

    Please be sure to include your project title, RP #, and an abstract. Posters should be limited to 3.5' x 4', and easels will be provided. Researchers may bring one or two students per poster.

     

    Pictures from the 2013 Poster Session

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  • Friday, September 12, 2014 - 12:00pm
    Miami, FL

    Dr. Fan Ye, P.E., spoke at Florida International University on September 12, 2014, on the topci of "High Intensity Reflective Sheeting in lieu of External Lighting for Overhead Roadway Signs in Florida." Dr. Ye is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at Ohio Northern University.

  • Thursday, September 11, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason 1133

     

    Mark your calendar for Dr. Anne Goodchild's presentation on logistics and freight, in the context of port operations and city logistics, on Thursday, September 11, 2014. 

     

    Title: "Moving Goods to Consumers: Land Use Patterns, Logistics, and Emissions"

    Abstract: There is a potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by replacing passenger vehicle travel with delivery service. These reductions are possible because, while delivery vehicles have higher rates of greenhouse gas emissions than private light-duty vehicles, the routing of delivery vehicles to customers requires less VMT than those customers travelling independently. In addition to lowering travel-associated greenhouse gas emissions, because of their tendency to occur during off-peak hours, delivery services have the potential to reduce congestion. Thus, replacing passenger vehicle travel with delivery service provides opportunity to address global concerns - greenhouse gas emissions and congestion.  

    While addressing the impact of transportation on greenhouse gas emissions is critical, transportation also produces significant levels of criteria pollutants, which impact the health of those in the immediate area. These impacts are of particular concern in urban areas, which due to their constrained land availability increase proximity of residents to the roadway network. This presentation addresses whether replacing passenger vehicle travel with delivery service can address both concerns simultaneously. In other words, can replacing passenger travel with delivery service reduce congestion and CO2 emissions as well as selected criteria pollutants? Further, does the design of the delivery service impacts the results? Lastly, how do these impacts differ in rural versus urban land use patterns?  

    This work models the amount of VMT, CO2, NOx, and PM10 generated by personal travel and delivery vehicles in a number of different development patterns and in a number of different scenarios, including various warehouse locations. In all scenarios, VMT is reduced through the use of delivery service, and in all scenarios, NOx and PM10 are lowest when passenger vehicles are used for the last mile of travel. The goods movement scheme that results in the lowest generation of CO2, however, varies by municipality.  Regression models for each goods movement scheme and models that compare sets of goods movement schemes were developed. These results allow for a comparison of the impacts of greenhouse gas emissions in the form of CO2 to local criteria pollutants (NOx and PM10) for each scenario. These efforts will contribute to increased integration of goods movement in urban planning, inform policies designed to mitigate the impacts of goods movement vehicles, and provide insights into achieving sustainability targets, especially as online shopping and goods delivery becomes more prevalent.

     

    Anne Goodchild is the Allan and Inger Osberg Endowed Associate Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington.  Anne Goodchild joined the faculty of the University of Washington in December 2005 after completing her PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering at UC at Berkeley. Her research interests lie in the analysis of logistic systems, with an emphasis on freight transportation.  Recent research has evaluated CO2 emissions in strategic routing and schedule planning in urban pick-up and delivery systems, policy and technology implementations to improve intermodal interfaces, and the relationship between freight activity and the economy.  In addition, a series of recent projects include primary data collection and analysis to build knowledge and algorithms for next generation freight models.  Before attending Berkeley she worked in consulting for 5 years in Europe and North America, for PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP and Applied Decision Analysis Inc., modeling business problems such as airline fleet maintenance scheduling. She holds an MS in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the UC at Berkeley, and a BS (with High Honors) in Mathematics from the UC at Davis.  She serves as Chair of TRB’s Intermodal Freight Transportation committee.

    Link to her UW website

  • Thursday, September 4, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Georgia Tech, Mason 1133

    Join NCTSPM and Georgia Tech for the joint kickoff meeting for student transportation organizations ITE, WTS, and ASHE. 

  • Thursday, August 28, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason Room 1133 (Georgia Tech)

    NCTSPM is proud to welcome Dr. Ram Pendyala as our inaugural speaker for the 2014 Fall Seminar series.

    Ram Pendyala comes to the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech as the Frederick R. Dickerson Chair in Transportation Systems effective Fall 2014.  Prior to this appointment, he served on the faculty of the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University.  

    His expertise lies in the study of sustainable mobility management strategies, analysis of public transportation systems including bus and rail technologies, and modeling the land use, transportation, energy, and air quality impacts of a wide range of transportation policies and technology solutions including pricing-based strategies.

     

    Title of Presentation:
    Multi-scale Models of Travel Demand and Supply: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Practice

    Abstract:The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the state of transport modeling thanks to significant progress in representing behavioral phenomena, computational techniques, hardware and software architecture, real-time data acquisition, and econometric and statistical methods. In this presentation, an overview of recent efforts related to the development and deployment of microsimulation model systems of travel demand and network supply will be provided.  The presentation will include a discussion of several case studies illustrating ongoing initiatives aimed at bridging the gap between research and modeling practice.  Finally, the presentation will identify emerging trends and disruptive technologies that motivate a transformative approach to transport model development in the future.  

     

     

  • Wednesday, August 20, 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
    SEB 122 (for live broadcast of the webinar)

    Tune in on August 20 for the U.S. DOT Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology (OST-R)'s "Transportation Innovation Series." Georgia Tech's own Dr. Patricia Mokhtarian will present her work in Transportation Systems Engineering, specifically travel behavior and multitasking, during this web-based seminar on August 20.

    The series is an outreach effort which aims to showcase University Transportation Centers (UTC) researchers and research related to U.S. DOT’s strategic goals of safety, state of good repair, environmental sustainability, livable communities, and economic competitiveness.  Both Georgia Tech and NCTSPM are long-time grant recipients of the UTC Program. 

    The OST-R Transportation Innovation Series is held the third Wednesday of each month and is broadcast live via web cast from U.S. DOT Headquarters. For more information: http://www.rita.dot.gov/node/10236

    Students and faculty at Georgia Tech are welcome to join us for a brownbag lunch and live broadcast of the webinar in SEB 122.

  • Thursday, August 7, 2014 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm
    Registration link is at http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov/t3/s140807_open_dataII.asp .

    From RITA's website overview:

    "'The transit industry is in the midst of a revolution from being data poor to data rich.' As a result, the need is greater for better management and policies to handle the newfound wealth. As transit agencies continue to address increasing service demands and decreasing budgets, maximizing technology and data investments through open data policies is necessary to retain and attract customers. Webinar participants will be introduced to the opportunities that open data provide and the challenges to overcoming technology and implementation strategies. This session will also focus on the legalities of open data in transit, including copyright laws, licensing, political and legal barriers, customer perceptions, confidentiality, governance, and economic development. Attendees should expect to learn about the benefits of open data policies and how transit agencies have successfully partnered with private entities to produce more real-time schedule information through the use and sharing of data. This informative webinar will serve as a foundation for developing transit agencies' guidelines to share schedule and real-time data. This session will highlight the experiences of several transit agencies that have had long histories of producing and sharing real-time and scheduled data for customers and private sector third party developers. Part I of this webinar, “Learn from the Legal Experts: Open Data Policy Guidelines for Transit - Maximizing Real Time and Schedule Data Use and Investments,” was broadcasted on December 5, 2013. 

    Click here for more information.

  • Tuesday, July 8, 2014 - 12:00pm
    Miami, FL

    Florida International University welcomes Dr. Young-Jun Kweon, P.E., Senior Research Scientist at the Virginia Department of Transportation. He will be presenting on the topic of "Developing and Implementing Safety Performance Functions in Virginia."

  • Thursday, June 12, 2014 - 7:30am to 3:00pm
    DoubleTree Hotel, Birmingham, Alabama
     
    Join the University of Alabama at Birmingham's Sustainable Smart Cities Research Center, NCTSPM, and the U. S. D. O. T. on June 12, 2014, for the 2014 Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium. The program will feature a keynote address by Barbara McCann, Director of the Office of Safety, Energy, and Environment, Office of the U. S. Secretary of Transportation. Other notable national and international speakers will The Honorable Mayor William A. Bell, JD, Mayor of the City of Birmingham, John Adlen, Director of the Sustainable Futures Lab, Staffordshire University, United Kingdom, and Linda C. Lucas, Ph.D., Provost of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, among many others.
  • Monday, June 2, 2014 - 8:00am to 12:00pm
    The Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center

    Join NCTSPM and the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech as they begin their search for the Frederick L. Olmsted Endowed Chair, through the Olmsted Symposium. Leading experts in sustainable urban infrastructure for a discussion of innovative research and practice, as they relate to the genius of Frederick L. Olmsted and his vision for improving the urban environment.

  • Saturday, April 12, 2014 - 8:30am to Sunday, April 13, 2014 - 3:00pm
    Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons

    On April 12 and 13, NCTSPM was proud to sponsor the second annual TransportationCamp South. Well-known for its unconventional approach to conference-going, TransportationCamp is a pioneer in the field of "unconferences", where attendees propose and lead sessions. This brings together both established and upcoming leaders in the transportation field for two days of learning, debating, connecting, and creating. 

    This year, the proceedings were organized by Georgia Tech's Dr. Kari Watkins, P.E., who recently authored a research project sponsored by NCTSPM, entitled "Evaluating the Impact of Real-Time Transit Passenger Information on Ridership and Mode Share".

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    Session Schedule

     

  • Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 8:00am to Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 5:00pm
    Birmingham, AL

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham is pleased to host the 2015 University Transportation Center (UTC) Conference for the Southeastern Region in Birmingham, AL on March 26-27, 2015. Below please find the Save the Date announcement.

    The event is organized in collaboration with Mississippi State University (National Center for Intermodal Transportation for Economic Competitiveness) and is co-sponsored by several UTCs in the Southeastern region.  The conference will bring together faculty, students, practitioners, and public agencies to disseminate information about on-going activities at partner universities and to enhance collaboration among the academic community as well as the private and public sector agencies in the region.

    Please save the date and make plans to attend. A call for abstracts will be issued in October 2014.  If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Virginia Sisiopiku.

  • Monday, March 24, 2014 - 8:00am to Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 5:00pm
    Georgia Tech Global Learning Center, 84 5th St NW Atlanta, GA 30308-1031

    Georgia Tech hosted the 2014 University Transportation Center (UTC) Conference for the Southeastern Region on March 24 and 25 at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center in Atlanta, GA. The conference drew attendees from universities, state DOTs, nonprofits and the private sector. Research from 20 universities was presented at the conference, on a range of topics: Operations and Management, Bike/Ped, Economics and Freight, Transit, Safety, and Infrastructure.

     

    Previous Slide 1/48 Next

    Images courtesy of Austin Wang and Samuel Harris, respectively.

     

     

    For more information, contact Audrey Leous at 404-385-5134 or audrey.leous@coa.gatech.edu

     

  • Friday, March 7, 2014 - 12:00pm
    Miami, FL

    Dr. Soheil Sajjadi, a post-doctoral research scholar and adjunct instructor at Florida Atlantic University, presented a seminar at Florida International University (FIU) on the topic of "Modeling Recurring and Non-Recurring Congestion Scenarios in Micro-Simulation using VISSIM." The event was held in the ITS lab at the FIU Engineering Center.

  • Friday, March 7, 2014 - 12:00pm
    Miami, FL

    Bill Hjeholt, Senior Vice President and Americas Director of Freight Rail presented a seminar on the topic of "Design of a New Mining Railroad in West Africa" at Florida International University (FIU) on March 7, in the FIU Engineering Center.

  • Thursday, March 6, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    Can Connected Vehicles “Connect” to the Transportation Infrastructure? How Transportation Agencies Can Improve Service through Connected Vehicles

    Brian L. Smith, PE
    Professor and Chair
    University of Virginia 
    Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    The connected vehicles program seeks to utilize wireless communications to allow the transportation system to operate in a more cooperative manner.  In February 2014, The U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) announced that it will begin taking steps to enable vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication technology for light vehicles.  This decision signaled an important step at the federal level to move forward with implementation of connected vehicle technologies.  However, it also indicated that the focus would be on V2V applications primarily intended to reduce crashes.  This leaves an important question as to how the infrastructure itself would “fit” in the program.

    The purpose of this seminar is to explore the potential role that transportation agencies may play in a connected vehicles environment.  In other words, given the ability of vehicles to transmit and receive data with other vehicles and the infrastructure, how can agencies better provide the services for which they are responsible?  In particular, the seminar will present results from research that developed and evaluated the following prototype vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) applications:
    •    Pavement Roughness Measurement
    •    Freeway Merge Management
    •    Roadway Safety Assessment (“Hot Spot” Identification)

    Brian Smith is Professor and Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Virginia.  Dr. Smith is also the director of the university’s Center for Transportation Studies.  His research focuses on intelligent transportation systems (ITS), particularly in advanced transportation management and connected vehicles.  Dr. Smith is a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and also a recipient of the 2006 ASCE Huber Research Award. He is an associate editor of the ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering.  Prior to joining the University of Virginia faculty, Dr. Smith worked for the Virginia Department of Transportation where he helped establish the department’s ITS program.

  • Friday, February 28, 2014 - 2:00pm
    Florida International University Engineering Center, room 2040

    On February 28, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Florida International University hosted the second lecture of the 2014 FIU CEE Distinguished Speaker Series.

                          

    Dr. Robert Bertini of Portland State University spoke on the topic "Can 'Big' Data Serve as a Foundation for Measuring and Improving Public Transportation Operations?" Dr. Bertini is a current Civil and Environmental Engineering professor at Portland State University, where he is the faculty lead for hte Portland Sustainable Transport Lab and chairs the Transportation Research Board Comittee on Traffic Flow Theory and Characteristics.

    Archived video of the seminar may be found here.

  • Friday, February 28, 2014 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
    FIU Engineering Center, Miami, Fla.

    Florida International University and the Southeastern Transportation Research, Innovation, Development and Education Center hosted a webinar by Professor Robert Bertini, Ph.D., P.E. of Portland State University on the topic of "Can Big Data Serve as a Foundation for Measuring and Improving Public Transport Operations?" The webinar was webcast live at the FIU Engineering Center in Miami, FL, on February 28, 2014. 

    View the webcast.

  • Thursday, February 27, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    Kyung-Hwa Kim is a Sr. Principal Planner at Atlanta Regional Commission, Atlanta Georgia. Before she joined at ARC, she worked at Metro in Portland, Oregon for 20 years as a modeler. She joined ARC five years ago as a Performance Analysis and Monitoring section manager. Her 20 years of experience at Metro covers from simple data analysis to complicated activity model development. Now she manages Air Quality, Congestion Management Planning, Safety, Performance measure, and Project Prioritization at ARC.

  • Friday, February 7, 2014 - 12:00pm
    Miami, FL

    Javier Rodriguez, P.E., ITS Operations Engineer with the District 6 Florida Department of Transportation, presented a seminar at FIU entitled "FDOT District Six Intelligent Transportation Systems and the Future of Managed Lanes in Southeast Florida" on February 7, 2014. 

  • Thursday, February 6, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    Dr. Peter Campbell, Professor of Systems Modelling and Simulation and Research Leader in the Defence and Systems Institute (DASI) at the University of South Australia; and Professor of Infrastructure Systems, SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong, will be speaking on "Modeling the interaction of traffic and land use planning in South East Metro Sydney."

    The SMART Infrastructure Facility group at UOW has just completed a contract for the NSW Government to model the interaction of traffic options and land use planning options against the possible responses of the effected populations of an area in South East Metro Sydney. The presentation will give a brief background to the project, discuss the architecture and design of the model and then the synthetic population, liveability factors and the travel data used to model mode decisions by the agents. Some performance issues will be discussed and some typical output presented. Plans for further extensions to the model will also be discussed.

  • Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 8:00am to Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 6:00pm
    Washington, DC

    The Transportation Research Board (TRB) 93rd Annual Meeting was held in Washington, D.C. at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, and Washington Hilton hotels. The information-packed program attracted more than 12,000 transportation professionals from around the world and featured more than 4500 presentations in 800 sessions and workshops, and ran from January 12 to 16, 2014.

    The spotlight theme for the 2014 TRB Annual Meeting was Celebrating Our Legacy, Anticipating Our Future, reflecting the transition in location of the conference from the Connecticut Avenue hotels to the Walter E. Washigton Convention Center.

    Previous Slide 1/8 Next Chengbo Ai presents the results of his research <span style="font-size:10px"> Chengbo Ai presents the results of his research </span> Chenglong Jiang speaks at the TRB meeting <span style="font-size:10px"> Chenglong Jiang speaks at the TRB meeting </span> Felipe Castrillon addresses the audience <span style="font-size:10px"> Felipe Castrillon addresses the audience </span> Greg Macfarlane and his research<span style="font-size:10px"> Greg Macfarlane and his research</span> James Anderson presents his research <span style="font-size:10px"> James Anderson presents his research </span> Zhengbo Li presents his research<span style="font-size:10px"> Zhengbo Li presents his research</span> Guin; Suh and Anderson <span style="font-size:10px"> Guin; Suh and Anderson </span>Infrastructure Research Group members<span style="font-size:10px">Infrastructure Research Group members</span>

    Georgia Tech students present the results of their research at the TRB's 93rd Annual meeting

     

  • Thursday, November 21, 2013 - 11:00am to 12:00pm

    Join us for Ricardo Daziano's talk "On the gap between the willingness to pay for and the marginal cost of battery electric vehicles with improved driving range."

    Ricardo A. Daziano is the David Croll Fellow Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. He received a PhD in economics from Laval University in 2010. He joined the CEE faculty in January 2011 adding a new dimension to the area of sustainable systems engineering in both teaching and research. Daziano's research focuses on engineering decision making, specifically on theoretical and applied econometrics of consumer behavior and discrete choice models applied to technological innovation in transportation and energy. Daziano's specific empirical research interests include the analysis of air travel demand, the study of pro-environmental preferences toward low-emission vehicles, modeling the adoption of sustainable travel behavior, estimating willingness-to-pay for renewable energy, and forecasting consumers' response to environmentally-friendly energy sources.

  • Thursday, November 7, 2013 - 11:00am

                        

    Dr. Patricia Mokhtarian recently joined Georgia Tech after 23 years at the University of California, Davis. In this seminar she offers an overview of her past, present, and future research interests, and invites a conversation on ways to employ those interests in the service of transportation planning and policy in the Atlanta region. Topics to be touched on include:
    -- the impacts of new communication technologies on travel;
    -- the desire to travel for its own sake;
    -- the role of self-selection in the impacts of the built environment on travel behavior;
    -- activities conducted while traveling, and how they affect mode
    choice and the valuation of travel time;
    -- the characteristics and travel behavior of voluntarily zero-
    or low-vehicle owning households; and
    -- trends in driver’s license

    Video of Dr. Mokhtarian's presentation

  • Wednesday, November 6, 2013 - 8:00am to Thursday, November 7, 2013 - 3:00pm
    Georgia Tech

    On November 6 and 7 2013, representatives from the Atlanta Regional Commission, the Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development at Georgia Tech, and the Metro Atlanta Chamber gathered with experts in transportation from across the country. These professionals participated in discussions and idea exchanges, providing opinions and input to the Atlanta Regional Commision, through the Federal Highway Administration's Capacity Building Program.

    View a video of the program here.

    Topics discussed included the efficient movement of freight within and between megaregions, cities connected by tight economic and interdependent infrastructure relationships. Additionally, the peer exchange provided attendees with the opportunity to learn from one another's perspectives, resulting in the development of a decision-making process and strategic initiatives to promote economic competitiveness.

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  • Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 11:00am to 12:00pm

    Join us Thursday, 10/31, @ 11 am in Mason 1133 for a showcase of work by students who are graduating in December 2013: 

    Video of the showcase

  • Thursday, October 17, 2013 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    WTS @ GT welcomes Catherine Owens, Senior Civil Engineerer at the Atlanta BeltLine.

  • Thursday, October 10, 2013 - 11:00am to Friday, October 11, 2013 - 12:00pm

                                        

    Join us on October 10, 2013 at 11 am for Jonathan Gifford, Director of the Center for Transportation Public-Private Partnership Policy at George Mason University. 

    Jonathan L. Gifford is Director at the Center for Transportation Public-Private Partnership Policy at George Mason University. Gifford’s primary area of expertise is transportation and public policy, with a particular focus on transportation and land use. His recent research investigates transportation finance and the role of public private partnerships, and behavioral considerations in transportation planning.

             

  • Tuesday, September 24, 2013 - 11:00am to 1:00pm
    Rooms 402-404, One Georgia Center (600 West Peachtree St NW, Atlanta, GA 30308)

    The Georgia Department of Transportation and the Georgia Transportation Institute jointly hosted a transportation research poster session. All researchers in the Georgia Transportation Institute (at the Georgia Institute of Technology, University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Southern University, Southern Polytechnic State University, Mercer University, and Albany State University) were to are invited to displaying active and recently completed GDOT-sponsored research projects. This poster session provided an opportunity for GDOT employees and administration to see the multitude of excellent projects that are underway and the scope of resources available at our universities.

    Click here for a downloadable list of all the posters and their authors.

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  • Thursday, September 19, 2013 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

                                     

    Dr. Catherine Ross, Director of the Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development, and PhD student Peter Hylton will address the state of practice and of research in megaregion-related multi-jurisdictional transportation efforts.  Specifically, the presentation will highlight planning practice and prospects from a groundbreaking survey of state transportation agencies and metropolitan planning organizations.  Combining research and survey results provides insights for practitioners, researchers, and policy makers.

    Megaregions are networks of urban centers and surrounding areas that are connected through economic, environmental, and infrastructure relationships.  Research has identified a megaregion around Atlanta—the Piedmont Atlantic Megaregion—that links areas from Raleigh, NC to Birmingham, AL and supports Southeastern economic strength.   

    Megaregions are emerging as the unit for global economic competitiveness.  However, decision making for megaregion transportation planning is fraught with challenges because all questions involve different government jurisdictions.  The research effort seeks to develop solutions for the transportation profession to address megaregion opportunities.  

    For a full listing of events, click here.

    Video of the presentation

                          

     

  • Thursday, September 12, 2013 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Mason 1133

    Crowned the world's busiest passenger airport for 15 consecutive years, the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is a rare jewel. Representing HJAIA is a distinguished panel of women from the Planning and Development Division who are instrumental in helping to make the airport the success that it is. From the perspectives of asset management, capital improvement, engineering, and planning, this panel will share their experiences, expertise, and knowledge.

    This event was co-hosted by WTS at GT.

    Video of the presentation

                             

     

  • Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm
    Mason 3132

    Butch Wlaschin, Director, FHWA Office of Asset Management, Pavements and Construction

                                      

    Abstract: MAP-21, new Federal Transportation Legislation Law now requires state DOTs to have comprehensive data-driven risk-based asset management plans to be used for decision-making.  FHWA is currently defining the process for the development of these plans via a formal Notice of Proposed Rule (NPRM).  This presentation will highlight currently federal thinking, the various approaches and challenges.  Additional Rules will require a consistent national assessment of the pavement condition on the Interstate and National Highway System, as well as a minimum threshold for the Interstate pavements. 

    What's in the Rules for States, MPOs, and local Governments?  What is your role - current - future?  Where would you spend that last transportation dollar?  Do you have the right tools in your tool box to make a risk-based decision.  Mr. Wlaschin detailed his role in the process and discuss how transportation departments are becoming more like a business organization.

    Watch the video here.

     

    This NCTSPM-sponsored seminar was held in conjunction with Dr. James Tsai’s class (CEE4803 Infrastructure Management: IT Applications). 

     

    BIO:

    Mr. Butch Wlaschin, became the Director, of the FHWA Office of Asset Management, Pavements and Construction in August 2007.  He leads of team of engineers and transportation specialists in developing policy, guidance and technical assistance for state and local transportation officials in those areas.  Mr. Wlaschin has more than 42 years of service in the transportation arena, having been the Deputy Director and Chief Engineer of the FHWA Federal Lands Highway Program from 1997 to 2007.  He holds a MSCE in Geotechnical Engineering from Georgia Tech and a BSCE from Lamar University.  He is a Life Member of ASCE and a Registered Professional Engineer.  He has been married for 43 years, and has three sons and 7 grandchildren.

  • Monday, June 3, 2013 - 11:00am
    UCF - Engr II room 202A

    Professor Dominique Lord of Texas A&M University visited UCF and conducted a seminar entitled "Before-after studies: Characteristics and Site Selection Bias."

    The seminar was well attended by MS and Ph.D. students, as well as postdoctoral associates and a visiting professor

  • Saturday, April 13, 2013 - 8:00am to Wednesday, April 17, 2013 - 6:00pm
    Chicago, IL

    Georgia Tech offers a dual degree program in Civil Engineering and City & Regional Planning. Several students in this degree program presented their work in a poster session at the 2013 American Planning Association national conference:

  • Friday, April 5, 2013 - 2:00pm

    Vukan R. Vuchic

    Video

    This seminar offered an overview of several stages of transportation-city relationships, followed by a review of transportation modes and their characteristics. Serious problems of traffic congestion and methods for achieving a balanced transportation system, particularly between private cars and public transportation, were defined. Examples from many world cities offered valuable lessons in successes and mistakes, emphasizing the great need for better understanding of the complex problems of urban transportation.

  • Thursday, April 4, 2013 - 8:00am to Friday, April 5, 2013 - 2:00pm
    Orlando, FL

    University Transportation Centers (UTC) Conference for the Southeastern Region was the first event of its kind, aiming to bring together faculty, students, practitioners, and public agencies in the Southeast, disseminate information about ongoing activities at all partner universities, and further enhance collaboration among the academic community as well as the private and public sector agencies in the region.  Faculty, staff and graduate students, as well as federal and state agency representatives, MPOs, transit managers, and consultants in the region and around the country were invited to attend and participate in this conference which we hope will evolve into an annual event. 

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    Presentations:

    Dr. Yang Wang - Next-Generation Wireless Bridge Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) System Incorporated with Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capability for Transportation Infrastructure Safety

    Dr. Amr Oloufa - Automated Capture of Freight Origin/Destination Data using License Plate Readers

    Dr. Nasim Uddin - Impact of Doubling Heavy Vehicles on Bridges

    Stephanie Amoaning-Yankson - Disasters and Linear Infrastructure Management

    Xia Jin, Albert Gan, and Md Sakoat Hossan - Traffic Management Centers: Challenges, Best Practices, and Future Plan

    Vivek Ghosal and Frank Southworth - Location of Automobile Manufacturing Plants, Development of Supply-Chains, and the Effects on Economic Development and Demand for Transportation

    Catherine L. Ross, David Jung-Hwi Lee, Subhrajit Guhathakurta, and Sarah M. Smith - Georgia SPLOST Database and Clearinghouse for Transportation Finance

    Virginia Sisiopiku, Albert Gan, Andrew Sullivan, and Despina Stavrinos - Impacts of Digital Advertising Billboards on Traffic Safety

    Berrin Tansel, Xia Jin, and Adjo Amekudzi Kennedy - Reducing Service Interruption in Linear Infrastructure Systems by Synchronizing Schedules for Selected Maintenance Activities

    Arindam Gan Chowdhury - Full-Scale Wall of Wind Testing of Variable Message Signs (VMS) Structures to Develop Drag Coefficient for AASHTO Supports Specifications

    Md Sakoat Hossan - Developing Traffic Incident Management (TIM) Framework

    Kia Mostaan - Opportunities and Challenges for Expediting Delivery of Transportation Design Build Projects

    Mohammad Ilbeigi - Development of Risk Management Strategies for State DOTs to Effectively Deal with Volatile Prices of Transportation Construction Materials

    Candace Brakewood - An Experiment Evaluating the Impacts of Real-Time Transit Information on Bus Riders in Tampa, Florida

    Hyung Woong Cho - Comparative Analysis of Dynamic Pricing Strategies for Managed Lanes

    Kathryn Colberg - Real-Time Work Zone Travel Time

    Aaron Greenwood - Effect of Roadside Environment on Diverge Identification in Work Zones

    Daniel Hester and Aref Motamedi Lamouki - Digital Advertising Billboards and Driver Distraction

    Amy Ingles and Stephanie Brodie - Sustainability Evaluation of Transportation Systems and Neighborhood-Level Developments

    Prabha (Popa) Pratyaksa - Safety Performance Evaluation of Converging Chevron Pavement Markings

    Landon Reed - Transit Data Standards: Informing Federal Policy and ITS Requirements

    Laura Schmitt - Calibration of the HCM 2010 Single-lane Roundabout Capacity Equations for Georgia Conditions

    James Wong - Are TMC's Ready to Buy Traffic Data? A Survey of TMC Managers on Third-Party GPS Data

    The conference was organized jointly by the four UTCs located in Federal Region 4 (southeast): The Southeastern Transportation, Research Innovation, Development and Education Center (STRIDE), the National Center for Intermodal Transportation for Economic Competitiveness (NCITEC), the National Center for Transportation Systems Productivity and Management (NCTSPM), and the National Center for Transit Research (NCTR). The following universities are consortium members in one or more of those four centers:  Auburn University, Florida International University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Transportation Institute, Hampton University, Louisiana State University, Mississippi State University, North Carolina State University, North Dakota State University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Central Florida, University of Denver, University of Florida, University of Illinois, University of Mississippi, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and University of South Florida.

  • Wednesday, April 3, 2013 - 8:00am to 6:00pm
    Birmingham, AL

    On April 3, the University of Alabama, Birmingham will host its annual Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium.

    The goal of the UAB Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium is to foster cross-disciplinary research, training, and outreach that integrate health, socio-economic impacts, and infrastructure design for the purpose of developing innovative solutions for sustainable smart cities and communities. Specifically, the symposium will bring together individuals with diverse expertise representing academics, corporations, organizations, policy makers on green construction materials; sustainable building and design concepts; social impacts of technology; modeling and simulation; medical sociology, health informatics, and social psychology; public health, emergency preparedness and response, and community resiliency; and government and public policy.

     

    Georgia Tech students with former Bogata mayor Enrique Penalosa and SSRC Chair Fouad Fouad at the inaugural Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium in Birmingham

    Catherine Ross, Phd of Georgia Tech discusses sustainable transportation at the second Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium, held April 3, 2013 in Birmingham

  • Tuesday, March 12, 2013 - 2:00pm

    Ram M. Pendyala

    Video

    Abstract:
    Forecasting a region’s travel has long relied on models of human travel behavior capable of representing the interrelationships among a multitude of activity-travel and location choices that people make over time and space. However, an issue that is often overlooked in choice modeling efforts is that key phenomena underlying model specification and estimation are often unobserved. As a result, analysts end up making very significant assumptions regarding underlying choice processes that may not necessarily be reflective of the behavioral heterogeneity present in the sample. Unfortunately, in many modeling contexts, these underlying phenomena are unobserved. This presentation articulated the problem and offered two contexts where the notion of latency was explicitly incorporated into the econometric behavioral model formulation.

  • Friday, March 8, 2013 - 2:00pm
    University Park, FL

    Hani S. Mahmassani, PhD of Northwestern University

    Video

    Abstract: On March 8, the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Florida International University  hosted a lecturer as part of the 2013 FIU CEE Distinguished Speaker Series: Hani Mahmassani, Ph.D. of Northwestern University.

    The March 8 presentation by Dr. Mahmassani discussed research findings regarding the complex dynamics among interacting agents of the factors affecting travel time reliability.

    More information

    Bio: Dr. Mahmassani holds the William A. Patterson Distinguished Chair in Transportation at Northwestern and serves as Director of the university’s Transportation Center. He joined Northwestern in 2007 from the University of Maryland and, previously, the University of Texas at Austin.

    Dr. Mahmassani’s research focuses on the role of information and communication in the operation of transportation systems, and the interaction between user decisions and system performance.  He has developed simulation and optimization platforms for large-scale transportation networks that support the operation and planning of these systems, including vehicular traffic, pedestrians and crowds, as well as intermodal freight and logistics systems.

  • Thursday, March 7, 2013 - 2:00pm

    Dr. John E. Abraham

    March 7, 2013

    Where:  Instructional Center, Room 109

    Video

    Abstract: The PECAS Model of Atlanta is a spatial economic forecasting model for the 20 county region.  It forecasts development patterns, home and business locations, economic interactions and economic performance into the future.  It is policy sensitive to transportation infrastructure, transportation services, land use regulations, taxes and environmental policy.  The developer model micro simulates individual construction events on 1.9 million parcels records representing the land in the region using a joint discrete-continuous logit formulation.  The spatial economic module simulates the location choices of businesses and households within the developed land, and their interactions that lead to travel on the road network, using an additive logit formulation.  The simulation is founded on a synergy between spatial economic theory and random utility theory.  The integrated modeling system includes both of these PECAS components, as well as the Atlanta Regional Commission's travel demand model and a spatial economic forecasting model.

    The presentation will cover the theory behind the PECAS modeling framework, the development of the PECAS model for Atlanta, the data used in the Atlanta region, the software implementation of the model, and the application of the model for the regional transportation plan.  Examples from other PECAS models (such as San Diego, Baltimore, Sacramento, Oregon etc.) will provide additional context.

    Bio: Dr. John E. Abraham is the principal software developer of the PECAS system for integrated land use transportation modeling, and co-author (with Dr. John Douglas Hunt) of the theoretical formulation.  Dr. Abraham has 20 years of experience in developing and calibrating spatial economic and travel demand models. Dr. Abraham has expertise in developing and calibrating models to provide computer simulations that are both accurate and practical for analyzing policy and scenarios. He is an expert on survey techniques for understanding preferences, measuring trade off rates, and predicting behavior. Dr. Abraham can quickly program advanced modeling techniques into software due to his strong mathematical and statistical background and his knowledge of algorithms and data structures. He is an expert software architect with a focus on object-oriented design. John is a principal at HBA Specto Incorporated in Calgary, AB, Canada.

  • Tuesday, February 19, 2013 - 2:00pm

    Dr. Alexandre Bayen

    Video

    Abstract:

    The first part of this talk investigates the problem of real-time estimation and control of distributed parameters systems in the context of monitoring traffic with smartphones. The recent explosion of smartphones with internet connectivity, GPS and accelerometers is rapidly increasing sensing capabilities for numerous infrastructure systems. The talk will present theoretical results, algorithms and implementations designed to integrate mobile measurements obtained from smartphones into distributed parameter models of traffic. The models considered include Hamilton-Jacobi equations, first order conservation laws and systems of conservation laws. Other techniques developed will be briefly presented as well, relying on ensemble Kalman filtering.

    In the second part of the talk, a game theoretic framework is developed to study Stackelberg routing games on parallel networks with horizontal queues, applicable to transportation networks. First, a new class of latency functions to model congestion with horizontal queues is introduced. Then, for this class of latency, the Stackelberg routing game is studied: assuming that a central authority can incentivize the routes of a subset of the players on a network, and that the remaining players choose their routes selfishly, can one compute an optimal route assignment (optimal Stackelberg strategy) that minimizes the total cost? A simple strategy is proposed, the Non-Compliant First (NCF) strategy, that can be computed in polynomial time. The strategy is showed to be optimal. It is also showed to be robust, in the sense that some perturbations of the NCF strategy are still optimal strategies.

    The results will be illustrated using a traffic monitoring system launched jointly by UC Berkeley and Nokia, called Mobile Millennium, which is operational in Northern California and streams more than 60 million data points a day into traffic models. The talk will also present a new program recently launched in California, called the Connected Corridor program, which will prototype and pilot California's next generation traffic management infrastructure.

  • Thursday, February 14, 2013 - 8:00am to 6:00pm
    Orlando, FL

    NCTSPM researchers presented their work at a symposium at UCF on Feb 14. More than 100 attendees came to share their progress to date, exchange ideas, and collaborate on future work. Students’ work was showcased in a special poster presentation. Research spanned the areas of safety, economic competiveness, intelligent transportation systems, traffic demand management, and other hot topics.

    Presentations:

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  • Saturday, February 9, 2013 - 8:00am to 6:00pm
    Atlanta, GA

    TransportationCamp South was held in  Atlanta on Saturday, February 9, 2013. The sixth TransportationCamp to date and the first to be held in the Southern U.S., TranspoCamp South brought together thinkers and doers in the fields of transportation and technology for a day of learning, debating, connecting, and creating.

     

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    Venue

    TranportationCamp South was held at the new Clough Commons, a state-of-the-art learning facility in the heart of the Georgia Tech campus in Midtown Atlanta.img=|/sites/default/files/u60/tcs1.jpg| | | |Drupal|Sponsors

    Support for TransportationCamp South was provided by the Georgia Tech Urban Transportation Information Lab, The Sierra Club – Georgia Chapter, Imagine Atlanta, and Citizens for Progressive Transit.

    More information:

  • Tuesday, January 15, 2013 - 6:45pm to 9:45pm

    Georgia Tech hosted a reception at the 2013 Transportation Research Board annual meeting. Researchers and students from a number of universities attended the reception.

     

     

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  • Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 8:00am to Thursday, January 17, 2013 - 6:00pm
    Washington D.C.

    STRIDE hosted a reception at the annual meeting, and the following NCSTPM students presented their work at this event

     

    Georgia Tech hosted a reception at the 2013 Transportation Research Board annual meeting. Researchers and students from a number of universities attended the reception.

     

     

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  • Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 2:00pm

    Video

    This lecture and discussion with Eno Foundation President and CEO Joshua Schank focused on the passage of MAP- 21 and the future of federal transportation legislation. Schank was transportation policy advisor to Sen. Hillary Clinton during the development of the last surface transportation authorization bill (SAFETEA-LU).

  • Sunday, June 3, 2012 - 8:00am to Friday, June 15, 2012 - 6:00pm

    Georgia Tech’s Advanced Civil Infrastructure Management course is also known as “Boot Camp,” and for good reason. It allows students to gain in-depth knowledge, develop mini-projects, and network with other students with similar research interests. The Boot Camp gives students an immersion experience in an infrastructure management course focused on physical assets.

    Transportation Systems graduate students Margaret-Avis Akofio-Sowah, Richard Boadi, Janille Colin-Smith, Chenglong Jiang, and Ross Wang, along with Building Construction graduate student Kia Mostaan participated in the two-weeklong intensive course from June 3 to June 15, 2012. The four-credit course brings together students and instructors from Georgia Tech, University of Delaware, The University of Iowa, Purdue University, The University of Texas at Austin, Virginia Tech, and University of Waterloo.

    Topics include infrastructure performance, data management, deterioration modeling, sensors, risk and reliability analysis, optimization, and research methods. Angela Alexander, director of organizational performance management at the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT), offered a guest lecture on the implementation of asset management as a business process within the agency.

    The course project required student teams to develop an asset management implementation plan for GDOT. The 2012 Boot Camp instructors included Adjo Amekudzi Kennedy

    (Georgia Tech), Gerardo Flintsch (Virginia Tech), Samuel Labi (Purdue University), Hosin Lee (The University of Iowa), Sue McNeil (University of Delaware), Lisa Rosenstein (Georgia Tech), Susan Tighe (University of Waterloo), James Tsai (Georgia Tech), and Zhanmin Zhang (The University of Texas at Austin). The course was co-sponsored by the NCTSPM.

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